Dares Phrygius


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Dares Phrygius

(dâr`ēz frĭj`ēəs), supposed author of a history of the Trojan War. Dares of Phrygia is mentioned by Homer in the Iliad as a priest of Troy. During the Middle Ages he was widely regarded as the author of De excidio Troiae historia [history of the destruction of Troy], which reputedly had been translated into Latin in the 5th cent. A.D. This work and the supposed diary of Dictys Cretensis became, through Benoît de Sainte-More's Roman de Troie, the most popular sources for medieval stories of the Trojan War.
References in periodicals archive ?
Beschorner, Andreas (1992): Untersuchungen zu Dares Phrygius.
In the original arrangement of the manuscript, 'Pers de Bermingham' was placed in the same booklet as such numerologically oriented pieces as the extracts from Dares Phrygius and Orosius, the exposition of 11 Corinthians 11.
by Samuel Artopoeus, Dictys Cretensis et Dares Phrygius de Bello Trojano, 2 vols (London: Valpy, 1825), 1, 295-339 (pp.
The medieval visions of the Trojan war depend on three major Latin texts of Roman provenance: Epitome Iliadus Homericae by Pindarus Thebanus, Ephemeris Belli Trojani by Dictys Cretensis and De Excidio Troiae by Dares Phrygius.
The presence of these deities is in sharp contrast to Joseph's main source of information about the war, the De excidio Troiae historia of Dares Phrygius.
De excidio Troiae historia, the allegedly eye-witness report of the siege and destruction of Troy attributed to Dares Phrygius, enjoyed great popularity and authority in the Middle Ages.