Darwin glass


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Darwin glass

[′där·wən ‚glas]
(geology)
A highly siliceous, vesicular glass shaped in smooth blobs or twisted shreds, found in the Mount Darwin range in western Tasmania. Also known as queenstownite.
References in periodicals archive ?
have foundered as Darwin glass has been identified at Nunamira (Cosgrove 1991: 168), Warreen and Pallawa Trounta (unpublished Southern Forests Archaeological Project data), in levels all c.
Apart from Darwin glass and thumbnail scrapers, several trends are obvious.
Darwin glass, carried from its restricted western source, has been recovered in terminal Pleistocene deposits in all major excavations in the region; this special material has been moved north to the Mackintosh site, and southwards and eastwards through the mountainous north - south valley systems of the Andrew, Franklin, Maxwell, Denison, and Gordon rivers to Nunamira in the Florentine Valley and Bone and Stone Caves in the Weld, c.
The relatively high frequency of Darwin glass in the Mackintosh site (Stern pers.
30 km east of the Mackintosh site in which Darwin glass is plentiful.
McNiven (1994) has argued that the evidence of Darwin glass and thumbnail scrapers supports an increase in the magnitude and frequency of mobility in this period; while we are unpersuaded by the particular argument, we agree that the evidence from a dozen sites occupied in this region at this time indicates a significant expansion of human activity.
The main raw material change after the glacial maximum is quartz and Darwin Glass use.
Artefacts of Darwin Glass were restricted to the upper section of Kutikina, with most of the top 14 levels containing 'a few glass flakes' (Jones 1988: 37; 1989: 769; 1990: 282).
For example, Darwin Glass flakes and thumbnail scrapers were recovered from Mack 90/1 (Stern & Marshall 1993: 14), while 40 Darwin Glass artefacts were documented from MLTE (Pocock 1992: 48).
In technology, distinctive changes included the relative increased use of quartz, Darwin Glass and thumbnail scrapers.
In terms of mobility magnitude, the increased use and movement of Darwin Glass across southwest Tasmania during this period suggests an increase in the area over which people were moving.
For example, at Kutikina, Jones (1990: 282) identified thumbnail scrapers made from Darwin Glass and chert sourced 26 km and 50 km respectively from the site, while the Darwin Glass thumbnail scrapers at Mack 90/1 are located 70 km from Darwin Crater (Stern & Marshall 1993: 14).