Gates, Daryl F.

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Gates, Daryl F.

(1926–  ) police chief; born in Glendale, Calif. He rose through the ranks of the Los Angeles police force to become its chief (1978–92). An adviser on crime to presidents and top government officials, he pioneered both the nation's first SWAT team—now an international model—and the use of helicopters to combat street crime. His reputation was tarnished after the notorious Rodney King beatings by members of the Los Angeles Police Department (1991). He defended his force against charges of racism throughout the trial that followed, but retired (1992) not long after quelling massive riots in Los Angeles following a jury's acquittal of the officers in question.
References in periodicals archive ?
He noted that the LAPD had a history of targeting and "roughing up" blacks, including several famous athletes, and that Police Chief Daryl Gates remained in power despite overseeing not just King's abuse but a string of police acts that had cost the city $8 million in payouts the year before.
He spent the morning and early afternoon attending the funeral for former Los Angeles police Chief Daryl Gates, observing a free medical clinic at the Sports Arena and going to a meeting at the Department of Recreation and Parks.
The site was founded by former police officers, including Daryl Gates, former chief of the Los Angeles Police Department, according to its Web site.
With the development of the first fully integrated EFB and surveillance suite, AirWorks' has differentiated itself in the marketplace," said Chief Daryl Gates, President of Global ePoint.
He talks about Nixon's "Waterworld" crisis, confuses OJ Simpson with "The Simpsons" while interviewing former LAPD police chief Daryl Gates, and questions a pair of ATF dog trainers about "canine discrimination".
Founded by Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl Gates in 1983 and organized as a nonprofit corporation (DARE America) in 1987, DARE is still used in around three-quarters of the nation's school districts.
In preparation for scripting her one-woman show, Smith interviewed some 200 people whose lives had been affected by the riots, and from these interviews she selected for portrayal in the published version approximately forty-five distinctively drawn voices, including those of a disabled Korean, a white male Hollywood talent agent, a Panamanian immigrant mother, a teenaged black gang member, a macho Mexican-American artist, Rodney King's aunt, beaten truck driver Reginald Denny, former Los Angeles police chief Daryl Gates, and a host of other victims and witnesses.
When Daryl Gates became chief in 1978, the number of black victims of the LAPD increased.
Dunn argues that when Chief Daryl Gates inspected his class at their graduation from the police academy, "Steven Spielberg was in his entourage and Fred Dryer sat on the reviewing stand" This supposedly is far more reflective of public respect for the department than the "negative tidal wave of publicity" following the King beating.
The cry of outrage over the beating of Los Angeles motorist Rodney King a few months ago and subsequent calls for the dismissal of that city's police chief, Daryl Gates, have been heard in almost every town in America that employs police officers to "protect and serve.
Lane, along with retired LA Police Chief Daryl Gates, remains actively involved in the business, developing top-tier law enforcement contracts; Lane will also maintain his role as Chairman of the Board.