surveillance

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surveillance

close observation or supervision maintained over a person, group, etc., esp one in custody or under suspicion

surveillance

the monitoring, and the associated direct or indirect forms of supervision and superintendence by the modern STATE, of the activities of its citizens. The capacity for surveillance possessed by modern NATION STATES has increased compared with those available to earlier forms of state, as the result of spectacular improvements in techniques for the collection and storage of INFORMATION and equally striking improvements in means of transport and communications.

For FOUCAULT, in Discipline and Punish (1975), the ‘disciplinary power’ of modern societies is an all-pervasive feature of these societies and a predominant feature of administrative power within them. Remedial and CARCERAL ORGANIZATIONS, which remove human liberty are not more than extreme forms of a generalized tendency to heightened surveillance within these societies.

Foucault's emphasis is disputed by many however. Our heightened awareness of, and concern about, situations in which some individuals are subject to loss of liberty reflects the new importance of a concern for liberty within modern societies and the many areas of life in which liberties have increased. Nonetheless, few dispute that – for good and for ill – surveillance and control are an important characteristic of modern societies and the modern state. Compare ORIENTAL DESPOTISM, ABSOLUTISM. See also SEQUESTRATION, TOTALITARIANISM.

surveillance

[sər′vā·ləns]
(engineering)
Systematic observation of air, surface, or subsurface areas or volumes by visual, electronic, photographic, or other means, for intelligence or other purposes.

surveillance

The systematic observation of airspace, surface or subsurface areas, places, persons, or things, by visual, aural, electronic, photographic, or other means.
References in periodicals archive ?
As locational information is coming to figure centrally within the securities agencies' emergent surveillance rationalities, it represents an ideal context for empirically examining whether individuals connect (spatial) big data productions about themselves to the dataveillance practices of the intelligence services.
By and large, however, in the counter-terrorism dataveillance sphere there is no sector or activity-specific set of protections.
It certainly won't give consumers the upper hand against the masterminds of dataveillance.
More precisely, I will develop the term iBorder to conceptually grasp how biometrics, dataveillance, predictive analytics, and robotics impact upon and change contemporary deterritorialised regimes and practices of inclusion and exclusion.
Instead of acts of publicity such as legal marches or online petitions, the 'datatariat' might need to meet the pervasive protocols of inequitable dataveillance employed by the securitised state with opacity.
This statement must be qualified by acknowledging that computerization, digitization, and automation, particularly in forms of consumer dataveillance and database amalgamation, move the inclusion/exclusion dialectic towards inclusive forms of surveillance.
REGAN, LEGISLATING PRIVACY: TECHNOLOGY, SOCIAL VALUES, AND PUBLIC POLICY (1995), examining various concepts and notions of privacy in public policy; GINI GRAHAM SCOTT, MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS: THE BATTLE FOR PERSONAL PRIVACY 343-64 (1995), explaining emerging battles for privacy in the media and Congress, at trade conferences, and among lobbyists; and SYMPOSIUM, SURVEILLANCE, DATAVEILLANCE, AND PERSONAL FREEDOMS: USE AND ABUSE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (1973), providing an overview of privacy-related problems in a technical era.
Privacy and dataveillance, and organizational strategy.
To explore how this paperless setup differs from new kinds of biometrics and dataveillance, I turn now to a Youtube video on the US passport, as it effectively raises borderline questions about borders and border crossing.
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND DATAVEILLANCE Concern about freedom from tyranny is a trademark of democracy.