decay product

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decay product

[di′kā ‚prä·dəkt]
(nuclear physics)
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This daughter isotope can decay into another radioisotope, or the daughter isotope, that will continue the radioactive decay chain or decay into a stable element that ends the chain.
The time it takes for one-half of a parent isotope to decay to a daughter isotope is called a half-life.
Moreover, in a brief span of time, an insufficient amount of daughter isotope would be formed to permit its precise measurement.
In other words, neither parent nor daughter isotope should have entered into the sample from its environment or escaped from the sample into its environment during the course of the sample's post-crystallization history.
Endress and his collaborators chose to study chromium-53, the daughter isotope of manganese-53, in carbonate fragments of the two CI chondrites known as Ivuna and Orgueil.
When this crust is subducted into the deep mantle, the uranium in it would decay, over a billion years, into significant accumulations of uranium's daughter isotope, lead-206.
It is caused by differential mobilisation (or precipitation) of uranium or its daughter isotopes from the deposition site or by a lack of time for the accumulation of the daughter isotopes to reach a state of equilibrium after the uranium has been deposited.
4 billion years, it means that after that time half of it will have decayed into its daughter isotopes (mostly lead).
The elements in the spent nuclear fuel are largely the daughter isotopes of the original uranium, and consist of elements such as thorium and protactinium.