Daughters of the American Revolution

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Daughters of the American Revolution

(DAR), a Colonial patriotic society in the United States, open to women having one or more ancestors who aided the cause of the Revolution. The society was organized (1890) at Washington, D.C., and has its national headquarters at Memorial Continental Hall there. The society has done much for the preservation and marking of historic places. In politics, the DAR has been criticized for its conservative policies. There is a similar but unrelated organization known as the Daughters of the Revolution.

Bibliography

See studies by M. Strayer (1958, repr. 1973) and P. Anderson (1974).

Daughters of the American Revolution

(D.A.R) conservative society of female descendants of Revolutionary War soldiers. [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 132]
References in periodicals archive ?
Daughters of the Revolution, Birmingham School of Acting, Crescent Theatre, Birmingham (Mar 16-18).
For example, the album opens with the rock 'n' roll mysticism of "Goodbye Daughters of the Revolution," a slash-and-burn call to arms for all those who have been waiting for this band's brand of loud soul to rise again.
In this case, Maxim's preview offered an opinion on an entire album based on having heard no more than the one track that had been released to radio, "Goodbye Daughters of the Revolution," and went so far as to assign a star rating.
The performances include Les Liaisons Dangereuses, comedy The Knocky, Marat/Sade, a play about the Marquis de Sade, and drama Daughters of the Revolution.
March 23 /PRNewswire/ -- In a moving and memorable ceremony, the California State Society Daughters of the Revolution honored Jamul Indian Village tribal Elder Jane Dumas as the "American Indian of the Year" for 2005.
Mothers Against and Daughters of the Revolution are two separate but dovetailed plays revolving around an election for the office of state governor.
However, the central character in Daughters of the Revolution is not McKeene but Michael Bern, a 55-year-old community college professor.
His attempt to track down the spy gives Daughters of the Revolution the impetus of a thriller, and it is not difficult to imagine it working well as a movie.
Like Destiny, which related the then rise of far-right politics in the West Midlands to Britain's post-colonial history, Mothers Against and Daughters of the Revolution (jointly presented as Continental Divide) are plays about a political big picture, as seen through the dilemmas of individuals.
Performed under the umbrella title Conti-nental Divide, Mothers Against and Daughters of the Revolution were written in response to coincidental commissions from different American theatres, but were designed to give complementary views of a presidential election, reflecting on the direction taken by American politics since the radical days of the 1960s.

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