Selznick, David O.

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Selznick, David O.,

1902–65, American film producer, b. Pittsburgh. He worked for studios in Hollywood before founding Selznick International Pictures in 1936. Selznick's most famous movie is Gone with the Wind (1939). His other important films include A Star Is Born (1937), The Prisoner of Zenda (1937), Rebecca (1940), Spellbound (1945), Duel in the Sun (1946), The Third Man (1949), and Tender Is the Night (1962). His second wife was the actress Jennifer Jones.


See R. Haver, Selznick's Hollywood (1980); B. Thomas, Selznick (1985); D. Thomson, Showman (1992).

Selznick, David O. (Oliver)

(1902–65) movie executive; born in Pittsburgh, Pa. Starting as an assistant to his father, Lewis Selznick, an early film producer, he worked for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) (1926–27), then Paramount (1927–31), and then RKO (1931–36) before forming his own company, Selznick International. He produced many successful films, the most famous being Gone With the Wind (1939), and later joined in European coproduction. His first wife, Irene Mayer, was the daughter of Louis B. Mayer of MGM; his second wife was Jennifer Jones, star of several of his films. He was renowned for intruding in his productions either through long detailed memos or, in the case of Gone With the Wind, actually directing a few scenes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Alfred Hitchcock's mesmeric romance won an Oscar for producer David Selznick.
David Selznick, chief investment officer of Kayne Anderson Real Estate Advisors.
2, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Kayne Anderson Real Estate Advisors ("KAREA"), the private equity real estate arm of Kayne Anderson Capital Advisors, which invests primarily in student housing, announced today the appointment of David Selznick as a Managing Director.
There's also a Tiffany cigarette case that 'Gone With the Wind' producer David Selznick gave to Clark Gable as a Christmas gift at the movie's wrap party, a love letter Mickey Mantle wrote to his future wife, and the only known recordings of some speeches and sermons given by the Rev.