de Havilland

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de Havilland

Sir Geoffrey. 1882--1965, British aircraft designer. He produced many military aircraft and the first jet airliners
References in periodicals archive ?
These and the many other de Havilland aircraft on display demonstrate that the company richly deserved its reputation for innovation.
In 1988, de Havilland Aircraft stopped making Twin Otters on a regular basis.
Instead, it provides a brief history of the de Havilland Aircraft Company and its development of the Mosquito, followed by three chapters that give the reader a look at the roles and missions of the fighter, bomber, fighter-bomber, nightfighter, high-altitude fighter, and photo-reconnaissance versions and the crews that flew them.
His first mission was to blow up the De Havilland aircraft factory at Hatfield, Hertfordshire, where the new Mosquito fighter-bomber was being built
The world's first jet-propelled airliner took to the skies at Hatfield in Hertfordshire, the home of the de Havilland Aircraft Company.
reports that Viking Air Limited, one of Canada's growing aerospace companies, deploys Inmedius S1000D software and services to convert, digitize and maintain its technical publication library of legacy de Havilland Aircraft DHC service manuals.
based Viking is focused on de Havilland aircraft products.
Worse, the British Government, BOAC and De Havilland aircraft company sent 110 trusting crew and innocent passengers to horrific deaths in airliners that were arguably the most beautiful ever built.
The campus is being built on ground near the factory that produced the de Havilland aircraft according to the Associated Press.
Lapp served as both Director of Technical Operations and Chief Engineer at de Havilland Aircraft of Canada.
The aircraft's fuselage is built in Belfast, Northern Ireland, by Bombardier's Shorts unit and the wings in Toronto, Canada, by Bombardier's de Havilland aircraft division.
The aircraft's fuselage is built in Belfast, Northern Ireland by Bombardier's Shorts unit and the wings in Toronto, Canada by Bombardier's de Havilland aircraft division.