De Lancey

De Lancey

(də lăn`sē), family of political leaders, soldiers, and merchants prominent in colonial New York. Étienne De Lancey or Stephen De Lancey, 1663–1741, b. Caen, France, was among the more famous of the Huguenots exiled by the revocation (1685) of the Edict of Nantes. He became one of the wealthiest men in New York City through his activities as a merchant. He married into the Van Cortlandt family and was for 24 years a member of the colonial assembly. His town house, built in 1719, was later sold to Samuel FrauncesFraunces, Samuel
, c.1722–95, American innkeeper, proprietor of the historic Fraunces Tavern in New York City. This building at the corner of Broad and Pearl streets was the De Lancey mansion before Fraunces purchased it in 1762 and opened it as the Queen's Head
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, who made it a notable tavern in the Revolutionary period. It still stands, probably the most famous of the old buildings on Manhattan island. His son, James De Lancey, 1703–60, b. New York City, educated in England, was a noted jurist and one of the most important figures in colonial New York politics. He was a justice (1731–33) and chief justice (1733–60) of the provincial supreme court and served (1753–55, 1757–60) as lieutenant governor. His political dexterity enabled him to control both the council and assembly, and after the suicide of the governor, Sir Danvers Osborne, he assumed control of that office also. He led the De Lancey faction against Gov. George Clinton in politics and against the Livingston faction when that family expressed its Presbyterian opposition to the chartering of King's College (now Columbia Univ.) as an Anglican institution. He was presiding judge at the trial of John Peter Zenger and was president of the Albany Congress (1754). His son, James De Lancey, 1732–1800, b. New York City, inherited the leadership of the De Lancey faction and, although he had opposed British colonial policies, was an important Loyalist officer in the American Revolution. He later received $160,000 for his estates, which were confiscated by the patriots. His cousin, James De Lancey, 1746–1804, b. New York City, was also a Loyalist during the Revolution. He commanded a cavalry troop in raids outside New York City before fleeing (1782) to Nova Scotia. Oliver De Lancey, 1718–85, son of Étienne, b. New York City, was a British officer who served in the last of the French and Indian WarsFrench and Indian Wars,
1689–1763, the name given by American historians to the North American colonial wars between Great Britain and France in the late 17th and the 18th cent.
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 and in the American Revolution. His son, Oliver De Lancey, 1749–1822, b. New York City, was also a British officer in the Revolution, succeeding John André as adjutant general of the British forces in America.
References in periodicals archive ?
IT'S 'almost' as big a'S the European Cup - it's certainly got a longer name - and in 1969 and 1970 the Caroline de Lancey Cowl Challenge Trophy was claimed by the crew of the Empress of Canada.
Contract notice: Construction of 36 housing accession and 17 rental units and one level basement Saint-Ismier (38330) - route de Lancey for SHON Total 4491.
This document was drawn up by some of the most substantial citizens of the Colony, men like Brigadier General Oliver De Lancey and Chief Justice Daniel Horsmanden .
De Lancey Ferguson laments that "the writing of Burns's life and the editing of his works was, for a full century after his death, in the hands of men temperamentally unfitted to sympathize with certain phases of his character," adding that Currie in particular was "a man timidly orthodox in politics and religion, fanatical in his aversion to alcohol, almost without personal acquaintance with Burns, and wholly without editorial experience" (liv).
In the 1750s the De Lancey party, an amalgam of royal officeholders, much of the commercial interest, Anglicans, and the Dutch Reformed, dominated the province.
Hence, Presbyterians could now argue that they were being persecuted religiously by the Anglican Church and politically by the pro-Anglican De Lancey party.
De Lancey, "Dragonsblood and Ultramarine: The Apothecary and Artists' Pigments in Renaissance Florence"; Andrew C.
De Lancey, editor of the BMA: The Sonia Sanchez Literary Review described her work as compelling and why Sonia Sanchez sees her as a talented poet.
In the paper industry, Papeterie de Lancey licensed Ross' Renaissance CS Enterprise Resource Planning and Supply Chain Management System.
Papeteries de Lancey is based in Brignoud, France, and annually produces 100,000 tons of coated ground wood paper for the European magazine industry.
I was provided with the necessary pass from the commanding officer to General De Lancey at Jamaica (Long Island), who furnished me with a pass directed to General Smith at Brooklin, who furnished me with a pass to Colonel Axtell at Flat Bush, who administered the oath and also furnished me with a pass to General De Lancey again at Jamaica.