Christine de Pisan

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Pisan, Christine de

(krēstēn` də pēzäN`), 1364–c.1430, French poet, of Italian descent. She wrote many verse romances and works in prose, as well as the lyric poems for which she is most famous. Remarkable in character and learning, Christine sought to express the dignity of woman. Her writings include Le Livre des fais d'armes et de chevalerie, first translated and printed by Caxton as The Book of Fayttes of Armes and of Chivalrye (1489; new ed. 1932) and Le Livre du duc des vrais amans (tr. The Book of the Duke of True Lovers, 1908).

Christine de Pisan:

see Pisan, Christine dePisan, Christine de
, 1364–c.1430, French poet, of Italian descent. She wrote many verse romances and works in prose, as well as the lyric poems for which she is most famous. Remarkable in character and learning, Christine sought to express the dignity of woman.
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Christine de Pisan

?1364--?1430, French poet and prose writer, born in Venice. Her works include ballads, rondeaux, lays, and a biography of Charles V of France
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A producao literaria de Christine de Pisan nao e um verso solto: integra o conjunto de obras e pronunciamentos de cunho pedagogico que, na Franca, desde o periodo carolingio, tiveram o intuito de civilizar o comportamento rude, por vezes barbaro, do homem com relacao a mulher.
My references to Stephanie Jed, an Italianist, and Christine de Pisan were motivated in part by the occasion for the original paper, the Legacy-sponsored panel at the Transatlantic Women II conference in Florence, Italy, in June 2013.
Hubo asimismo sorpresas gratas durante las pesquisas, una de ellas la vida de Christine de Pisan, originaria de Italia, cuya biografia y poemas se incluyen en el libro: "Su padre fue llamado a Francia por Carlos v para que fuera su astrologo y consejero.
The class observes that Jocelyn comports herself in a manner starkly at odds with that stipulated by norms of the times as evidenced in the admonitions of de Pisan.
de Pisan's version, however, reframes the tale to celebrate Griselda's strength and her success in reforming her husband and de Pisan presents Griselda as the first of many examples of female strength, seeing Griselda's patience not as a quality that benefits her per se but as what enables her to restore order.
Fourteenth century single mom Christine de Pisan wrote poetry and letters and was quite possibly the first European woman to support herself by writing.
For example, Gabrielle Suchon, Harriet Taylor, Mary Wollstonecraft, Blaise Pascal, Christine de Pisan and Simone de Beauvoir all (indirectly) broach the question of the unthought and allow hope for change in epistemology and social conditions.
But "This face--not her face" reminds the reader to be vigilant against particular attributions of identity, for example to de Pisan or Guest herself.
The feminist viewpoint is not forgotten and is given a well-balanced treatment, with analysis of Christine de Pisan, Helen Cixous, Nancy Miller, and A.
Philippe de Mezieres, Eustache Deschamps, Honore Bovet, and Christine de Pisan are the poets.
AD Of all the books that interest me, or to mention one in particular, I'm currently reading Rabelais and Christine de Pisan.
In contrast to these metacritical authors, as Lorna Jane Abray's essay shows, Christine de Pisan appropriates Troy's fall quite pointedly as an exemplum; over the course of her career, Christine repeatedly evokes Hector and his fate as a warning to the powerful dukes of her own time, whose lack of self-control might otherwise lead to "a kingdom-ruining holocaust comparable to the fiery destruction" of Troy.