Christine de Pisan

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Christine de Pisan:

see Pisan, Christine dePisan, Christine de
, 1364–c.1430, French poet, of Italian descent. She wrote many verse romances and works in prose, as well as the lyric poems for which she is most famous. Remarkable in character and learning, Christine sought to express the dignity of woman.
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Pisan, Christine de

(krēstēn` də pēzäN`), 1364–c.1430, French poet, of Italian descent. She wrote many verse romances and works in prose, as well as the lyric poems for which she is most famous. Remarkable in character and learning, Christine sought to express the dignity of woman. Her writings include Le Livre des fais d'armes et de chevalerie, first translated and printed by Caxton as The Book of Fayttes of Armes and of Chivalrye (1489; new ed. 1932) and Le Livre du duc des vrais amans (tr. The Book of the Duke of True Lovers, 1908).

Christine de Pisan

?1364--?1430, French poet and prose writer, born in Venice. Her works include ballads, rondeaux, lays, and a biography of Charles V of France
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In addition to Christine de Pizan, the authors examined include Anne de France, Laura Cereta, Marguerite de Navarre and the Dames de la Roche.
Already Christine de Pizan, writing around 1400, tried to introduce an arbitration authority--composed of other princes and personalities of the highest moral authority--to settle disputes between princes.
de Pizan, Christine 1983 The book of the city of ladies.
That said, one has to ask whether the reactions and testimony of individuals such as Catherine of Siena, Vincent Ferrer, Pedro of Aragon, Eustace Deschamps, Christine de Pizan, Jean de Roquetaillade, and so on are that representative of the understanding and reaction of Christian society as a whole.
In chapter one, Newman introduces the large field of her investigation through five case studies in which a spiritually questing biographical or autobiographic persona experiences an encounter with a goddess: Francis of Assisi with lady Poverty in Sacrum commercium sancti Francisci; the Soul with Lady Love in Mechtild of Magdeburg's Flowing Light of the Godhead; Henry Suso with Sophia in his The Life of the Servant; Will with Holy Church in Langland's Piers Plowman; and Christine de Pizan with Reason, Rectitude, and Justice in The Book of the City of Ladies.
With Lori Walter's essay on Christine de Pizan we move away from the law, as Waiters focusses on two non-legal texts by an early fifteenth-century writer who, throughout her career, concerned herself with fama as reputation.
Her thorough discussion of Rachel Speght is especially interesting when she demonstrates how Speght drew on the earlier work of Christine de Pizan.
IN her introduction to a collection of essays on The Reception of Christine de Pizan from the Fifteenth Through the Nineteenth Centuries: Visitors to the City, Glenda K.
In contrast to those who see the debate over sex differences as just a literary one, she claims that writers such as Christine de Pizan were aware that humour and satire could help to shape the relationship between men and women and contribute to creating a new world.
Although his title evokes the City of Ladies by Christine de Pizan, a late medieval writer who celebrated extraordinary women from history and literature, Simons concentrates on the mostly inconspicuous and ordinary women who became beguines in the thirteenth through sixteenth centuries.
In "Christine de Pizan and 'Dueil angoisseux,' " Liane Curtis provides a brief summary of the literature on women in early music and Christine's unique position as a highly respected poet both during her life and after her death.
Marsh finds that the Middle English poet was acquainted with various works of Deschamps, Machaut, Froissart, and Christine de Pizan (p.