De Quincey


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De Quincey

Thomas. 1785--1859, English critic and essayist, noted particularly for his Confessions of an English Opium Eater (1821)
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Like his beloved opium, the mail-coach introduced the young De Quincey to previously unimaginable visions, not only the 'glory of motion' engendered by its sheer velocity, but subtler effects, too: the 'animal beauty and power' of the coach-horses, and the way the eye of the wakeful mail-rider would glance 'between lamplight and the darkness upon solitary roads'.
Hundred years ago the famous English essayist Thomas de Quincey said "Tea, though ridiculed by those who are naturally coarse in their nervous sensibilities, will always be the favorite beverage of the intellectual.
The house was formerly the home of Captain de Quincey, who had a famous herd of pedigree Hereford cattle.
The Simpson Thacher team includes Ben Spiers, Ben Squires, Audrey Fassi-Fihri and Hamesh Khatkar (Corporate); and David Vann and Alessia De Quincey (Antitrust).
In his letter to "a friend in Bengal," published in Tait's Magazine in December 1835, Thomas De Quincey warned that England was on the threshold of a "vast, rapid, and decisive" crisis, by which he referred to the ongoing social campaigns for parliamentary reform (Vol.
GUILTY THING: A LIFE OF THOMAS DE QUINCEY BY FRANCES WILSON NEW YORK: FARRAR, STRAUS AND GIROUX.
It begins with an essay by Thomas De Quincey from the late Georgian age and ends with an essay by George Orwell during the Second World War.
Confessions of an English Opium-Eater is the unabridged audiobook rendition of an autobiographical work by Thomas De Quincey (1785-1859), who was prescribed the drug opium for pain relief from a chronic condition, and became an addict fascinated by his hallucinatory experiences while intoxicated.
De Quincey had been introduced to laudanum in 1804 as a treatment for trigeminal neuralgia, a disease of the trigeminal nerve that runs down the face.
From his 1821 Confessions of an English Opium-Eater to his later political essays on the "China Question" dating from the 1840s and 1850s to his revised and expanded Confessions of 1856, the orientalist rhetoric of Thomas De Quincey reveals a persistent vacillation between virulent John Bullism and an anxious, indeed fearful, entrancement with the Orient and its powers of possession and imaginative expansion.
Thomas de Quincey propone, en su oscuramente divertida obra El asesinato considerado como una de las Bellas Artes, que si bien el deber de todo ciudadano respetuoso es indignarse moralmente ante las acciones de un delincuente, e incluso tratar de impedir la realizacion de un crimen por todos los medios posibles, una vez que el delito es consumado esta postura moral resulta inutil y hasta "el hombre mas virtuoso tiene derecho a disfrutar del fuego de un incendio y hasta a silbarlo, como ocurriria en cualquier espectaculo que suscitara la expectacion del publico para luego defraudarla".