De Quincey


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De Quincey

Thomas. 1785--1859, English critic and essayist, noted particularly for his Confessions of an English Opium Eater (1821)
References in periodicals archive ?
Thomas De Quincey, The Collected Works of Thomas De Quincey, vol.
That is why QDG commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Jasper de Quincey Adams, 39, doesn't mince his words for any soldier unfortunate enough to be struggling with the pace after returning from a three week break.
2) Quotations from the Confessions refer to the Penguin edition; all other De Quincey citations, unless otherwise noted, refer by volume and page to David Masson's edition of the Collected Writings.
De Quincey "strongly resembles" Coleridge, but this is not to say they actually resemble each other.
The claiming of such unexpected affiliations has precedent--England's first surrealist novelist, Hugh Sykes Davies, used to insist (quite rightly) that Coleridge and De Quincey had got there long before Breton.
De Quincey E, Kostkova P, Jawaheer G, Farrell D, McNulty Ca, Weinberg J; e-Bug Working Group.
One of the most notable examples comes from essayist Thomas De Quincey, author of Confessions of an English Opium-Eater and a key figure in the development of recreational drug taking in Europe and the United States.
These movements, moreover, are not necessarily balanced: the "whole arch of ascending visions" on which De Quincey "had meant to launch" us is replaced by an improvised stopgap: a too short, too steep "peroration" about ascent (15:169).
Robert de Quincey, Lord of the Manor of Ware, having served Henry III in the French Wars, was granted leave to hold an Annual Fair on the 'eve of the (festival of the) Virgin Mary'.
In 1811, however, Lloyd checked into a private asylum, only to escape several years later, and turn up at the house of Thomas de Quincey, claiming to be the devil.
Daniel Mangiavellano's "De Quincey, Coleridge, and the Literary Model of Habit" shows how De Quincey's writings helped to construct later views of opium addiction or "habit," and how such published views in turn affected the relative public perceptions of De Quincey and Coleridge's use of opium.
In Dan Leno and the Limehouse Golem Ackroyd takes de Quincey's celebrated essay as a central text that affects most of the story's protagonists' fates: young George Gissing in the Reading Room of the British Museum reads de Quincey's work, admiring his ability to romanticise the deplorable killing monster, and takes it as an inspiration for his own essay "Romanticism and Crime"; sitting next to Gissing, John Cree is studying de Quincey while musing on his own work, a social drama about the misery of the London poor; then there are various newspaper interpretations of the murders and speculations concerning the perpetrator's identity, creating a myth of a killing Golem, which form an independent, fictitious narrative of the mystery.