DeCSS


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DeCSS

(DEcrypt CSS) Software that breaks the CSS copy protection system used on DVD movies and decrypts the encrypted data. It allows DVDs to be copied to a PC, which can then be viewed from the hard disk, uploaded to someone else or burned onto a DVD-R or DVD-RW.

Hacked By a 15-Year Old
The software was engineered through a hacker network known as MoRE (Masters of Reverse Engineering) that obtained some of the CSS code. It was completed by 15-year-old Jon Lech Johansen, a Norwegian student, ostensibly to play DVDs on his Linux machine. However, Johansen released the final version over the Internet in late 1999, causing considerable dismay to the DVD movie industry. Other "DVD ripping" programs, such as DVD Decrypter, were later created by different parties. See CSS.
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Released under a free software license, DeCSS was soon being downloaded from hundreds, possibly thousands, of websites.
The studios also face an ongoing legal problem in California, where the Court of Appeal recently ruled that DeCSS is a form of speech and that banning it violates the First Amendment.
GARBUS: Do you know whether there are DeCSS sites overseas?
Nor is DeCSS a prerequisite for making illegal copies.
Moore said he isn't exactly sure what his company's software does to duplicate DVDs, or if it contains the hotly debated DeCSS code.
Last week, the federal 2nd Circuit Court in Gotham banned a Web site from posting DeCSS because it violates the Digital Millennium Copyright Act's ban on copyright-hacking technologies.
WASHINGTON The studios had a relatively easy time in last summer's DeCSS trial in New York portraying the creators and defenders of the DVD hacking program as a bunch of geeky, adolescent troublemakers out to thumb their noses at the law.
District Judge Lewis Kaplan found no legitimate purpose for the DeCSS program, which allows viewers to decode DVD movies and play them on computers.
Before the trial had even begun, both sides largely conceded the outcome: a win for the studios and a rejection of the defense's claim that posting the DVD hacking program DeCSS on the Internet is protected by the First Amendment.
Emmanuel Goldstein") and his company, 2600 Enterprises, to maneuver around the court's injunction against them to cease posting the DeCSS utility, the member companies of the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) today filed a motion to prohibit the defendants from hyperlinking to other Internet websites offering DeCSS.
Lawsuit, filed by the studios under the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright, targets a program known as DeCSS (DeCode Content Scrambling System), which can strip off discs the encryption codes used by the studios to control access to DVDs.
The MPAA argues that the program, DeCSS, violates the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998 because it "circumvents" DVD's security measures.