Deadman


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deadman

[′ded‚man]
(civil engineering)
A buried plate, wall, or block attached at some distance from and forming an anchorage for a retaining wall. Also known as anchorage; anchor block; anchor wall.
Enlarge picture
Deadman #6 © 2002 DC Comics. (Cover art by José Luis Garcia Lopez.)

Deadman

(pop culture)

Despite never gaining the high sales it deserved, Deadman has been one of the most influential and critically acclaimed characters in superhero comics. Deadman was conceived by maverick writer Arnold Drake in 1967 and first appeared in the pages of Strange Adventures #205, in what was to be artist Carmine Infantino’s last strip before becoming editor-in-chief of DC Comics. The tale starts with the death of its star, Boston Brand, a daredevil trapeze artist assassinated by a sniper in the middle of his act. But death is not the end for Brand, as a disembodied voice (of Rama Krishna, a sort of god) tells him that to avenge his death he must roam the earth in ghostly form until he finds his killer. Unfortunately, the only clue to the killer’s identity is that he has a hook on his arm, but Brand now has the convenient ability to enter people’s bodies and take them over.

The strip was blessed with an unusual setting—Brand’s circus with its colorful performers— an intriguing quest at its heart, and an unconventional, complex hero. Brand was an argumentative, egotistical, and somewhat self-pitying character who, despite his powers and stylish costume (as a ghost, he still wore his acrobat’s red high-wire outfit, complete with white death’s-head mask), was no better than the reader. In 1967, this was revolutionary content and in retrospect Brand can be seen as the first “mature” superhero. Another revolutionary factor in the strip’s critical appeal was the art of Neal Adams, who took over the feature for its second installment. Adams came to the strip from the world of advertising and newspaper strips, and brought a realism to comic books that had never been seen before. He also had a gift for dynamic drawing and stylish design; Deadman was peppered with pop-art effects and witty in-jokes. In short, this was a very cool comic.

Over the next two years, Deadman roamed the country endlessly, tracking down the Hook in what was very much the comic book equivalent of the 1960s television show The Fugitive. In his travels, he came across supervillains (such as the Eagle), drug pushers, Batman, and a group of killers called the League of Assassins. The strip’s complexity and depth were perhaps too much to take for most readers, and after its twelfth installment, the series was canceled. Undeterred by this, Adams went on to draw further Deadman appearances in numerous comics, including Aquaman, The Justice League, The Brave and the Bold, and Challengers of the Unknown. Editors finally revealed Deadman’s killer to be an assassin in the pay of a mysterious criminal called Sensei, and the pair went on to tangle with each other throughout the 1970s.

While it is true that Deadman was then relegated to a relatively minor status, he nevertheless continued to appear in backup spots in Adventure Comics and Phantom Stranger, which were notable for their high quality. A 1986 miniseries—the first of six relaunches as of 2004—drawn by José Luis Garcia Lopez (Adams’ talented successor on the strip), featured a final showdown with Sensei. The strip showed Deadman finally regaining his human form only to lose it again, vowing to continue his fight against evil, wherever it may appear. For a while later on in the decade, DC repositioned him as a horror character, now looking more like a living skeleton than a well-toned superhero, but recent miniseries have been very much in the intelligent, elegant tradition of Deadman’s early days.

As a commercial project, the strip has never rewarded DC’s continued faith in it, though the publisher has repackaged the Adams run on several occasions, as have several European publishers (the feature is highly regarded across Europe). But in introducing the concept of “serious” superhero strips, Deadman was clearly the precursor to the likes of Watchmen and The Dark Knight Returns, and it is now widely viewed as one of the key strips of the 1960s. Deadman joined the title team in the comic book series Justice League Dark, which debuted in September 2011. —DAR

deadman

A buried concrete block, log, plate, or the like, which serves as an anchorage, e.g., as an anchor for a tie to a retaining wall; depends on its own weight and passive pressure from the soil to hold it in place.
References in periodicals archive ?
In evidence yesterday, PC Deadman said he had followed the Cavalier with his blue lights on.
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It looked a penalty but Deadman instead booked Burke for diving.
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He wasn't injured in the slightest, we were amazed," said Mr Deadman, of Northfield Fire Station, who attended the scene.
Wrexham's assistant manager Kevin Russell was unhappy about the referee's decision to send off defender Danny Williams, Mr Deadman showing a second yellow card following a clash involving Grimsby striker Michael Reddy.
Darren Deadman, of Peterborough, is the referee at Hillsborough on a day when leaders Charlton host Oldham, third-placed MK Dons are at home to Preston (after manager Phil Brown's departure, ex-Town defender David Unsworth is in temporary charge of North End) and fifth-placed Sheffield United visit Bournemouth.
Millwall were denied two strong penalty claims by ref Darren Deadman in the goalless first leg at the Galpharm Stadium.
But referee Darren Deadman was having none of it, a point not lost on Derby boss Nigel Clough.
Crue Fest 2 Starring: Motley Crue with Godsmack, Theory of a Deadman, Drowning Pool And Introducing Charm City Devils.
Rangers manager Paulo Sousa insisted Alberti's double would have earned his side all the points had it not been for referee Darren Deadman.