Debye


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Related to Debye: Debye equation, Debye length, Debye temperature

Debye

Peter Joseph Wilhelm. 1884--1966, Dutch chemist and physicist, working in the US: Nobel prize for chemistry (1936) for his work on dipole moments

debye

[də′bī]
(electricity)
A unit of electric dipole moment, equal to 10-18Franklin centimeter.
References in periodicals archive ?
t], the equation (53) with (51) reflects the Debye law [T.
ij] and the mass density, we can compute the acoustic Debye characterisitic temperature [[THETA].
where the Debye screening length [lambda] for the double layer thickness is taken to be the thickness of the Stern layer.
The Debye rings in all billet tube samples were similar to the starting billet sample.
Alarmed, two universities with Debye connections, Utrecht and Cornell, invested in historical investigations that offered up the line that Debye was no worse than most.
Wemer Heisenberg, Wolfgang Pauli, and other prominent physicists like Debye were also interested in such fields.
Lawrence Memorial Award (1985), the Irving Langmuir Award in Chemical Physics (1990), the American Chemical Society Award in Theoretical Chemistry (1994), the Hirschfelder Prize in Theoretical Chemistry (1996), the Ira Remsen Award (1997), the Spiers Medal of the Royal Society of Chemistry (1998), the Peter Debye Award in Physical Chemistry (2003), the Welch Award in Chemistry (2007), and the Hershbach Award in Molecular Dynamics (2007).
Debye in Fundamental and Applied Science; Isotope as Indicator: Radiation as an Indicator for Biochemical Processes);
For dimensions large compared to the Debye screening distance [k.
He ascribed this action to "a decrease in the Debye relaxation frequency" (inter alia, a measure of water diffusion which behaves inversely proportionally to viscosity, being a time-measure of the redistribution of water molecules in the water lattice) "and, correspondingly, an increase in viscosity of those water molecules which are localised at the membranes' surfaces" but not (as implied in the Pauling and Miller hypotheses) solely to an effect on the water "surrounding" the cell membranes.
de Kruif, Van't Hoff Laboratory, Debye Institute, Utrecht University, 3584CH, Utrecht, Netherlands; phone: +31 30 253 91 11; fax: +31 30 253 33 88; email: deKruif@nizo.