Debye-Hückel theory

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Debye-Hückel theory

[də¦bī ′hik·əl ‚thē·ə·rē]
(physical chemistry)
A theory of the behavior of strong electrolytes, according to which each ion is surrounded by an ionic atmosphere of charges of the opposite sign whose behavior retards the movement of ions when a current is passed through the medium.
References in periodicals archive ?
The overestimation of the Faraday's constant was consistent with the use of the Debye-Huckel equation and Davies' equation to predict the activity coefficients of the ions by the speciation program SOILSOLN.
For dilute solutions of non-electrolytes, or electrolytes when the Debye-Huckel equation for activity coefficient is applicable, the value of a may be replaced by solute as concentration c.
Desnoyers commented that the properties of ionic and non-ionic surfactant solutions can be predicted reasonably well up to about 100 degrees C from measurements near room temperature by using a mass-action model combined with a suitable extension of the Debye-Huckel equation.