Decating

decating

[də′kād·iŋ]
(textiles)
A finishing process in which fabric is sponged or steamed in rollers to set the width and length as well as to achieve smoothness. Also known as decatizing.

Decating

 

the processing of woolen fabrics with steam or hot water to prevent shrinking during subsequent processing and wearing and to improve the external appearance. Decating is done with special units known as decating machines, which have different designs for dry and for wet decating. Decating machines for dry decating consist of a hermetically enclosed cylindrical boiler, within which is located a rotating hollow cylinder with a perforated surface that is suited for coiling the fabric. The steam fed to the boiler passes through the layers of fabric, which are wound with minimum tension, into the cylinder and is drawn off through its open end. In wet-process decating machines, the cylinder with the fabric wound upon it rotates in a trough filled with hot water (50°-60°C). The decating machine is connected to both steam and water piping.

References in periodicals archive ?
Industrial Area police nabbed Murad Massaih involved in decating cylinders gas illegally.