Decebalus


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Decebalus

 

Died 106 A.D. King of the Dacians.

Decebalus became king in the year 87. In 89, after a successful war against the Romans under Emperor Domitian, he concluded a peace by which the Romans undertook to pay yearly subsidies and to furnish the Dacians with Roman craftsmen and masters of “the peaceful and martial trades.” In 101-02 and in 105-06 he waged wars with the Roman emperor Trajan which, despite the desperate resistance of the Dacians, ended in the conquest of their territory and its conversion into the Roman province of Dacia. After the Roman seizure of the Dacian capital, Sarmizegethusa, Decebalus for a time continued the struggle. Seeing that it was futile, he committed suicide by running himself through with a sword.

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The state created during and at the initiative of Burebista was dismembered into four to five political formations and, even though Decebalus had the same initiative, the Geto-Dacian state never had the same borders again.
Even if the Geto-Dacian state did not maintain the same borders after Burebista's death, his successors, culminating with Decebalus, attempted at the the same unification policy, in order to prevent that Dacia would be transformed into a Roman province.
The emperor himself is shown in a wide variety of situations--addressing his troops, interrogating a prisoner, and receiving the severed heads of Dacian warriors--while the defeated king Decebalus is about to commit suicide by slitting his throat.
A rock-hewn likeness of his opponent, Decebalus, the king of Dacia (now Transylvania), commands equal attention on the wooded slopes of the opposite bank, part of Romania.
In the First and early Second Centuries, the Dacians, from what is now Romania, were the tough enemies of Rome under their king Decebalus.
Some of the Dacians' names are recorded on gravestones, including that commemorating a child named Decebalus, after the Dacian king.