December solstice


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December solstice

[di′sem·bər ′säl·stəs]
(astronomy)
Winter solstice in the Northern Hemisphere.

December solstice

December solstice
i. That point on the ecliptic occupied by the sun at the maximum southerly declination. Also called the first point of Capricornus.
ii. That instant at which the sun reaches the point of maximum southerly declination, on or about December 23. A solstice that occurs when the position of the earth is at the perihelion, or when it is nearest to the sun, but its north pole is inclined away from the sun. It occurs on or about December 23, when there is winter in the Northern Hemisphere and summer in the Southern Hemisphere. See (i).
References in periodicals archive ?
44[degrees] at the June solstice, returns across the equator at the September equinox and reaches its most southerly point at the December solstice over the Tropic of Capricorn (23.
January 1st comes about 10 days after the December solstice and a few days before Earth's near point to the Sun each year.
They found that the axis of the temple follows an azimuth of 114[degrees], which aligns with a distant marker that indicates the point where the Sun rises on the December solstice, the time when summer melt-water from the Andes Mountains would peak and flood the farmland.
This means that at the June solstice the Sun is 23 1/2[degrees] north of the equator, and at the December solstice it's 23 1/2[degrees] south.
The latitude on Earth over which the sun hovers on the December solstice is still called the Tropic of Capricorn, even though precession long ago moved the solstice into Sagittarius.
That's only a few hours after the December solstice and a few hours before full Moon.
We get a similar swell of questions around the December solstice.