decision problem

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decision problem

(theory)
A problem with a yes/no answer. Determining whether some potential solution to a question is actually a solution or not. E.g. "Is 43669" a prime number?". This is in contrast to a "search problem" which must find a solution from scratch, e.g. "What is the millionth prime number?".

See decidability.
References in periodicals archive ?
This method can be applied for any decision problems considering any number of alternatives.
Thus, choosing the right construction project partners has been one of the most important decision problems that require delicate care.
These definitions facilitate the analysis of simple, but non-trivial cost-benefit decision problems, which should help students to understand the key ideas--and make the correct answer to the Ferraro and Taylor problem unambiguous.
a system of law) as inputs; the outputs are answers to decision problems concerning responsibilities, liabilities and risks.
However, under many conditions, numerical values are inadequate or insufficient to model real-life decision problems.
Every group expressed the problem that appeared if the family around the patient had a conflict; then, the decision problems and the communication problems were increased.
In the decision problems of interest, the options are represented with qualitative attributes that form a decision table.
The CMMI enables companies to better serve their customers interests by providing answers to the customers decision problems.
Multi-Objective programming is a part of mathematical programming dealing with decision problems characterized by multiple and conflicting objective functions that are to be optimized over a feasible set of decisions.
Discussing spatial expert systems, Malczewski (1999) notes a number of decision-making obstacles relevant to suitability modeling: spatial decision problems are not well understood; knowledge of spatial processes and decisions includes causal, common sense, and meta-knowledge but differs from person to person; people will approach and solve spatial problems differently; and communication barriers may exist between experts and people who operationalize decision support.
It has been one of the most widely used multi-criteria decision making tool to model real world decision problems.
The complex decision problems can be formulated in the form of simple hierarchy tree.