decision making

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decision making

Making choices. The proper balance of human and machine decision making is an important part of a system's design.

Human Decision Making Is Complex
It is easy to think of automating tasks traditionally performed by people, but it is not that easy to analyze how decisions are made by an experienced, intuitive worker. If an improper analysis of human decision making is made, the wrong decision making may be placed into the machine, which can get buried in documentation that is rarely reviewed. This will become a critical issue as artificial intelligence applications proliferate. See AI.

Algorithmic or Heuristic
From a programming point of view, decision making is performed two ways: algorithmic, a precise set of rules and conditions that never change, or heuristic, a set of rules that may change over time (self-modify) as conditions occur. Heuristic techniques are employed in AI systems.

decision making

the processes by which individuals, or groups and organizations, decide actions or determine policies. Obviously, decision making covers a wide area, involving virtually the whole of human action. Sociologists, psychologists and political scientists, among others, have been interested in decision making in different ways, though there are overlapping interests. These perspectives include: formal analysis of the decision strategies of actors in competitive situations (as in THEORY OF GAMES, and in approaches derived from Economics, e.g. see EXCHANGE THEORY); analysis of decision-making behaviour in the dynamics of small groups (see GROUP DYNAMICS); studies of organizations (see ORGANIZATION THEORY); studies of access to political decision-making (see COMMUNITY POWER).
References in periodicals archive ?
Now, the question is whether such information load increase leads to a decrease in the effectiveness of decision-making or not.
This article presents the Situated Clinical Decision-Making Framework as a means to help novice nurses reflect on the decisions they make in their clinical practice and develop features of expert clinicians.
Does shared decision-making enhance the patient's authority?
Manager remembers only the emotion associated with past experiences during decision-making in crisis situations, and it is not necessary to recall the details and contexts of the experiences which may occurs during no critical decision situations (Ford & Goia 2000).
The fear of making a mistake, of not being perfect, carries over into career planning, as unhealthy perfectionists may try to avoid or delay decision-making or may acquiesce to plans made by trusted adults who "know best.
To this point, this paper has illustrated that (1) that decision making is a cognitive process (2) there are no good or bad decision makers, only different decision-making styles, (3) that decision making is individualistic influenced by cultural orientation and life circumstances, and (4) that whatever people do is correct, there is no wrong decision, as long as a some decision is made.
Technology promises the power to deliver insight through applied logic, selectivity and monitoring of key relationships, which offer rich inputs to the decision-making discussion and drive better and faster decision-making.
Mau investigated cultural dimensions by comparing results for White, African, Hispanic, and Asian American high school and university students in the United States on the Career Decision-Making Difficulties Questionnaire.
Little investigative attention has been given to the decision-making skills, career/vocational development, and the relatively narrow range of career options for students with disabilities in today's labor market.
All countries share a need to more clearly define national interests, to identify threats to national security (both internal and external), to develop appropriate structures, and to refine decision-making processes that meet their new security requirements.
The most troubling result, Hotopf contends, was the tendency of incapacitated persons to trust in physicians who failed to recognize or address those patients' decision-making deficiencies.

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