Deckhouse


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deckhouse

[′dek ‚hau̇s]
(naval architecture)
A low building or superstructure, such as a cabin, constructed on the top deck of a ship which may or may not extend to the edges of the deck.

Deckhouse

 

(1) An enclosed structure on a ship’s main deck or on superstructures that does not extend to the sides. Living quarters and administrative and duty rooms, usually arranged in several tiers, are located in the deckhouse.

(2) A separate duty room on a ship, which, depending on its purpose, is known variously as the pilothouse, chart house, conning tower (on naval warships), or radio room.

References in periodicals archive ?
One was called Norfolk Charlie who had towed the deckhouse off a shipwreck on the inner deeps to the creek and lived there until the Second World War.
Once the mooring ropes had been cast off, we headed for one of the bars in the aft deckhouse.
This GAO report addresses the challenges of embedding so many technologies in one ship, noting, "Rather than introducing three or four new technologies (as is the case on previous surface combatants), DDG 1000 plans to use a revolutionary hull form and employ 11 cutting-edge technologies, including an array of weapons, highly capable sensors integrated into the sides of a deckhouse made primarily of composite material--not steel, and a power system designed for advanced propulsion as well as high-powered combat systems and ship service loads.
Because of her size the deckhouse was moved forward.
The ship's deckhouse will be built primarily from composite rather than steel and the shipbuilder is still refining the process for large scale composite manufacturing and assembly.
Having a deckhouse and accommodation for three men, albeit 'submarine-like' it had to be towed by the steamer, Olga, during its voyage to London.
No injuries or damage resulted, but the propeller wound up embedded in the deckhouse, sealing a watertight door.
Shaping for low RCS will be taken even further in the US Navy's planned new DD(X) class of destroyers, whose profile is dominated by a large all-composite integrated deckhouse incorporating the ship's low-signature electronically steered antenna arrays and integrated multi-function mast.