decompiler

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decompiler

A program that converts machine language back into a high-level source language. The resulting code may be very difficult to maintain as variables and routines are named generically: A0001, A0002, etc. See disassembler.
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The new report corroborates what a Reddit user previously shared online about discovering something about an AR program upon decompiling the Unpacked 2018 app.
In [3], authors have analyzed the effects of compiler optimization (in three levels), removing symbol information and applying basic binary obfuscation methods (such as instruction replacement and control flow graph obfuscation) on several features mainly obtained from disassembling and decompiling the executable binaries (e.
In the process of decompiling, the files are processed in batches, and about 1M data costs 2 seconds.
apk, decompiling it, opening "framework-res/res/values/bools.
Clothes," you think, and a wave of under armour nanobots rapidly stitch themselves into a self clean- ing anti-microbial mesh around your genitals, decompiling dead skin cells to use as material.
Decompiling code into its source code is hard to impossible, but getting assembly code for compiled software is easy.
Using a programming language that does not yet have a decompiling feature will help a lot in securing the program for a longer period.
Because borrowers deliver scanned documents in a wide array of file types (such as PDF-unindexed, PDF-indexed, jpeg and tiff), use several file-naming conventions and send multiple documents and single documents in each file, lenders have more employees spending time opening, converting, decompiling and filing document images.
Award Notice: Decompiling and fuzzing to enharden software against network cyber exploits
The volume explores the wealth of automatic features in this decompiling tool and discusses in detail the user's interactive role in successfully retrieving usable source code from compiled executables.
1992) (finding that decompiling a video game program to determine its functional interface was "fair use").
Additional features include Animated GIF creation, Animated GIF decompiling, complete drag and drop support, and versatile preferences for maximum control.