craniectomy

(redirected from Decompressive craniectomy)
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craniectomy

[krā·nē·′ek·tə·mē]
(medicine)
Surgical removal of strips or pieces of the cranial bones.
References in periodicals archive ?
Decompressive craniectomy for medically refractory intracranial hypertension due to meningoencephalitis: report of three patients.
Thus far, 112 patients have been enrolled of 165 anticipated, which is "already many, many times higher than the largest study ever conducted of early decompressive craniectomy," Dr.
Proposed use of prophylactic decompressive craniectomy in poor-grade aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients presenting with associated large sylvian hematomas.
Decompressive craniectomy for intractable cerebral edema: Experience of a single center.
Intracranial pressure and cerebral oxygenation changes after decompressive craniectomy in children with severe traumatic brain injury.
Unfortunately, there has come a time when the severity of the primary brain injury is such that if a decompressive craniectomy is performed as a lifesaving intervention, the patient is most likely to remain severely disabled (4).
In a recent, prospective observational study of 50 severe TBI patients, Aarabi et al found that decompressive craniectomy for intracranial hypertension is associated with better outcomes in those patients that have a decrease in ICP (20).
Outcome following decompressive craniectomy for malignant swelling due to severe head injury.
Participants were shown three clinical scenarios, with their willingness to consent to decompressive craniectomy measured before and after seeing prediction outcome data and observed outcome.
Their choice to test the procedure decompressive craniectomy is relevant as the likelihood and nature of unfavourable outcomes have severe practical implications for the quality of life of surviving patients and families.
There is currently a resurgence of interest in the use of decompressive craniectomy in the management of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) (1-5).