Deconstructivism


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Deconstructivism

(1984–)
An architectural style known as “Neomodernism,” or “Poststructuralism,” It takes many of its forms from the work of the Constructivists of the 1920s, such as Tchernikhov and Leonidou. It takes modernist abstraction to an extreme and exaggerates already known motifs. It is an antisocial architecture, based on intellectual abstraction. Some examples are Bernard Tschumi’s designs for the Parc de la Villette, Paris; Peter Eisenman’s Wexner Center for the Visual Arts, Ohio; and work by Frank Gehry, Architectonica, SITE, and Morphosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Forsythe's famous ballet deconstructivism was in evidence [see Reviews/International, october 1995, page 105].
For instance, the architectural firm of Skidmore Owings Merrill recently finished work on a New York City building where Classicism was a better fit than Deconstructivism.
University of Bahrain associate professor in the College of Engineering Dr Rafee Hakky lectures on deconstructivism in architecture at Bahrain Fort Museum, 5pm, August 10.
The Bilbao Guggenheim appears under Deconstructivism but this apparently shouldn't be connected to Post-Modernism.
By this insight, Heidegger paved the way for later postmodern interpreters of Nietzsche--notably, Derrida and Faucault--to discern in a way not thematized by Heidegger himself how dominant already were the respective "moves" of deconstructivism and genealogy in the fragmentary and aphoristic styles of Nietzsche's philosophizing.
On the other hand, there have continued to be fascinating, though often short-lived, tendencies: Metabolists, the hybrids, megastructures, Deconstructivism, and, towards the turn of the century, the beginning of new, more expressive tendencies.
He pleads for architecture based upon generations of application and adjustments, architecture of human scale stimulating the senses positively, as opposed to intended disorientation, anxiety and tension caused by the paradigms of deconstructivism.
However I didn't realize how committed you were to the theory of deconstructivism.
In the wake of deconstructivism (which, we are now told by the very publicists who turned it into a movement, was never supposed to be one), the very idea of a period style raises suspicions.