Deconstructivist architecture

Deconstructivist architecture

Architecture that seeks to arrive at new forms of expression by turning away from structural restraints and functional and thematic hierarchies, and toward often nonrectangular, fantastic, and seemingly disjointed designs. Such work often represents an application of the philosophical theories of Jacques Derrida in France, who sought to arrive at new insights in literature by breaking apart literary texts into their contradictory and hidden components of meaning; this philosophy has been applied in the late 20th century to architectural structures usually called deconstructivist architecture.
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In fact, in the space of the gallery, deconstructivist architecture was posited not as a break from modernism but as resuming an unfinished project.
While Wigley held that reducing deconstructivist architecture to a formal reading of what its wall text had described as "twisted volumes, warped planes, and clashing lines" would be to falsely attribute to deconstruction "the material representation of an abstract idea," it was arguably Johnson's formal language and a highly constructed formal similarity between projects that became equated with an identifiable style.
In the end, this sentiment was echoed by others: Ingraham said deconstructivist architecture "will ultimately be the shift in the idea of architectural structure--its dematerialization--that will interfere most substantially with the material surfaces of architecture.
In a similar vein, we can define deconstructivist architecture, the regnant building fad of the moment, as what is always being proposed and never actually built in the city of New York.
Like so much second-rate deconstructivist architecture, the new academic building at Cooper Union resembles a peacock in the sense that, under all the fuss and feathers -- structurally speaking -- stands a fairly ordinary building that squats in its cubic box without too much incident.
But it may be that the main problem with deconstructivist architecture in general, and 41 Cooper Square in particular, is that computer-generated imaging can create structures that far surpass the skills of the present generation of engineers or the capacities of the very materials they use to build.
Although she had been lauded for at least the previous decade as the wonder woman of deconstructivist architecture, no one had taken Hadid on; her designs were considered theoretical and unbuildable.
Nevertheless, Gehry's virtuosity and experimentation allowed for his inclusion, alongside a younger generation, in the New York Deconstructivist Architecture exhibition (also 1988), with its ambitions to forge a hyper-Modernist avant-garde.
But in contrast to the plaster works, whose historical frame of reference is that of Constractivism and its specific combination of architectural and sculptural elements, the glass and mirrors in "Beach Changing Houses" resonate more with a pavilion a la Dan Graham, and the readymade aspects bring to mind sketches of deconstructivist architecture.