recharge

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recharge

[rē′chärj]
(electricity)
To restore a cell or battery to a charged condition by sending a current through it in a direction opposite to that of the discharging current.
(hydrology)
The processes involved in the replenishment of water to the zone of saturation.
The amount of water added or absorbed. Also known as groundwater increment; groundwater recharge; groundwater replenishment; increment; intake.

recharge, groundwater recharge

The replenishment of water in the ground, e.g., through injection or infiltration from trenches outside the construction area.
References in periodicals archive ?
It would seem that the presence of chloride sufficient to restrict crop water extraction could only increase the chance of deep drainage under zero tillage.
Here, P is rainfall, and S is the surplus lost as surface runoff and/ or deep drainage, on day n.
The soil tends to produce both high runoff and high deep drainage under annual cropping, due to the low water-holding capacity of the Kandosol.
Deep drainage is one portion of the water balance that is being examined closely as part of improving water use efficiency in irrigation agriculture (Radford et al.
50 m, and represents a significant capacity to both store water during wet periods, but also to lose that water via deep drainage before utilisation by a crop root system.
Summer-dominant rainfall areas such as the QMDB have been considered to have a lower risk of deep drainage than the winter-dominant rainfall zones of southern Australia, because a greater proportion of annual rainfall coincides with high potential evaporation (SalCon 1997; Walker et al.
Use of water balance models is expanding rapidly, in estimation of biomass and crop yields where runoff estimation maybe less important, and in runoff and deep drainage estimation where runoff estimation is important.
A key driver for the conversion of a high salinity hazard to a salinity risk is an increase in deep drainage (potential groundwater recharge) with change in land use from native vegetation to cropping or grazing (Scanlon et al.
There have been a number of studies of deep drainage under native vegetation in the low rainfall areas of southern Australia (e.
Conversion of 5 points, construction of a new stump track with 160 m length, track renewal on about 1 600 m, built deep drainage on about 600 m length.
Irrigated agriculture in Australia, and the cotton industry in particular, have become increasingly aware of water losses due to deep drainage (DD, expressed as nun/ha where 100mm/ha = l ML/ha) in furrow-irrigated Vertosols (Silburn et al.