Diwali

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Diwali,

the festival of lights, celebrated by Hindus, Jains, and Sikhs; one of the most popular holidays in South Asia. Extending over five days, it marks the beginning of the new year in the Vikrama calendar, and usually falls in October or November. Though the holiday celebrates many things depending on the religious tradition, it is associated with the triumph of good over evil, light over darkness, and understanding over ignorance; small earthenware oil lamps are lighted and placed in rows at the tops of buildings and floated on the Ganges and other bodies of water. In Hinduism it welcomes Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth, and is also associated with a number of legends, e.g., the return of Rama and Sita from exile, Rama's killing of the demon Ravana, and Krishna's slaying of the demon Narakaasura. Jains commemorate Mahavira's attainment of moksha (nirvana); the establishment of the Khalsa and other events marked by Sikhs.

Diwali

a major Hindu religious festival, honouring Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth. Held over the New Year according to the Vikrama calendar, it is marked by feasting, gifts, and the lighting of lamps
References in periodicals archive ?
The morning of Deepavali I woke up to a steady stream of notifications on my smartphone.
Diwali is a contraction of Deepavali which means 'row of lamps'.
It is believed that the gods descended on earth and celebrated Dev Deepavali.
Over a fifth (21 per cent) said it was Indian cuisine, 15 per cent named Bollywood films and music and seven per cent said traditional festivals such as Deepavali.
Good to know Tip: A fortnight after Diwali, the ghats of Varanasi are illuminated with lakhs of diyas as the city comes together to host Dev Deepavali.
The embassy community embodies this spirit with a local staff-led rotating annual gala celebrating, in turn, religious holidays from the three major ethnic communities--Eid al-Fitr, Chinese New Year and Deepavali.
99 in conjunction of Deepavali or Diwali, the festival of lights.
Derived from the Sanskrit word Deepavali, meaning 'row of lamps,' it is also most popularly known as the Festival of Lights.
Among all the Indian festivals I love Holi and Deepavali [festival of lights].
Similarly, although Islam is the country's official religion, Deepavali, Christmas and the Chinese New Year are widely celebrated.
This Deepavali season, Singapore's Changi Airport was illuminated with a burst of vivid hues and dazzling lights as the Changi Airport Group (CAG) commemorated the traditional Hindu festival with a variety of themed garden displays across the airport's four terminals.
Most of the victims were traders who had come to the store to buy supplies for Deepavali, the Hindu festival of lights.