defender

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defender

[di′fen·dər]
(industrial engineering)
A machine or facility which is being considered for replacement.

Defender

Bryan, William Jennings
(1860–1925) defended Creationism in famous Scopes trial. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 383–384]
Canisius, St. Peter
Jesuit theologian; buttressed Catholic faith against Protestantism. [Christian Hagiog.: Attwater, 276]
Daniel
halts Susanna’s execution; gets her acquitted. [Apocrypha: Daniel and Susanna]
Darrow, Clarence
(1857–1938) lawyer; Bryan’s nemesis in Scopes trial (1925). [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 131]
Defender of the Faith
Henry VIII as defender of the papacy against Martin Luther (1521). [Br. Hist.: EB, 8: 769–772]
Defenders, The
father-son lawyer team in early 1960s. [TV: Terrace, I, 197]
Donatello
Miriam’s ardent friend ever ready to defend her. [Am. Lit.: The Marble Faun]
Hector
bravely defended Troy against Greek siege for ten years. [Gk. Lit.: Iliad]
Mason, Perry
detective novels and TV series feature courtroom drama by lawyer. [Am. Lit.: Gardner, Erie Stanley, in EB, IV: 416; Radio: Buxton, 186–187; TV: Terrace, II, 199]
Ridd, John
defender of the parish of Oare in Somerset. [Br. Lit.: Lorna Doone, Magill I, 524–526]
Zola, Emile
(1840–1902) attacked Army cover-up of Dreyfus affair in J ’accuse (1898). [Fr. Hist.: Wallechinsky, 60]
References in classic literature ?
Those who were hauled up within reach of the power-ful clutches of the defenders had the nooses snatched from them and were catapulted back through the first line to the second, where they were seized and killed by the simple expedient of a single powerful closing of mighty fangs upon the backs of their necks.
The defenders of religion can enter the lists against impiety without disadvantage at the present moment, for there is a great deal of talent in the royalist press.
The wood had been soaked in oil, for in an instant it was ablaze, and a long, hissing, yellow flame licked over the heads of the defenders, and drove them further up to the first floor of the keep.
As there was no water on these hills, the defenders could never have anticipated a long siege, but only a hurried attack for plunder, against which the successive terraces would have afforded good protection.
It is true that his nature was extremely conservative; that after a brief period of youthful free thinking he was fanatically loyal to the national Church and to the king (though theoretically he was a Jacobite, a supporter of the supplanted Stuarts as against the reigning House of Hanover); and that in conversation he was likely to roar down or scowl down all innovators and their defenders or silence them with such observations as, 'Sir, I perceive you are a vile Whig.
In order to live, a government, to-day as in the past, must press the strong men of the nation into its service, taking them from every quarter, so as to make them its defenders, and to remove from among the people the men of energy who incite the masses to insurrection.
Then we shall be right in getting rid of the lamentations of famous men, and making them over to women (and not even to women who are good for anything), or to men of a baser sort, that those who are being educated by us to be the defenders of their country may scorn to do the like.
She saw the impending fate of her defenders and there sprung to life in her savage bosom the spark of martyrdom, that some common forbear had transmitted alike to Teeka, the wild ape, and the glorious women of a higher order who have invited death for their men.
After a few historical quotations, he comes to two modern defenders of introspection, Stout and James.
Thomson; Ensigns Hicks and Grady; the band on the pier playing the national anthem, and the crowd loudly cheering the gallant veterans as they went into Wayte's hotel, where a sumptuous banquet was provided for the defenders of Old England.
But the task would exceed our prerogatives; and, as history, like love, is so apt to surround her heroes with an atmosphere of imaginary brightness, it is probable that Louis de Saint Veran will be viewed by posterity only as the gallant defender of his country, while his cruel apathy on the shores of the Oswego and of the Horican will be forgotten.
The warm defender of the sacredness of the family re- lation is the same that scatters whole families,--sun- dering husbands and wives, parents and children, sisters and brothers,--leaving the hut vacant, and the hearth desolate.