degree

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Related to Degrees: Degrees of Comparison, Academic degrees

degree

1. a stage in a scale of relative amount or intensity
2. an academic award conferred by a university or college on successful completion of a course or as an honorary distinction (honorary degree)
3. Med any of three categories of seriousness of a burn
4. (in the US) any of the categories into which a crime is divided according to its seriousness
5. Music any note of a diatonic scale relative to the other notes in that scale
6. a unit of temperature on a specified scale
7. Geometry a measure of angle equal to one three-hundred-and-sixtieth of the angle traced by one complete revolution of a line about one of its ends.
8. Geography
a. a unit of latitude or longitude, divided into 60 minutes, used to define points on the earth's surface or on the celestial sphere
b. a point or line defined by units of latitude and/or longitude.
9. a unit on any of several scales of measurement, as for alcohol content or specific gravity.
10. Maths
a. the highest power or the sum of the powers of any term in a polynomial or by itself
b. the greatest power of the highest order derivative in a differential equation
11. degrees of frost See frost

Degree

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

A degree is 1/360 of the circumference of a circle. The number 360 may come from older notions about the year being 360 days in length.

Degree

 

in music, any of the tones or notes in a scale or tuning system. European music of the 17th through the 19th century was based on a system of 12 degrees, in which major and minor diatonic scales predominated; chromatic scales, however, were also used. The 12 degrees were divided into two groups: seven degrees corresponding in C major to the white keys on the piano and five degrees corresponding to the black keys. In 20th-century music all 12 degrees are frequently used without such division, yielding a chromatic scale. Other systems include the pentatonic scale, with five degrees, and microtonal scales with 24 or 36 degrees.

degree

[di′grē]
(chemistry)
Any one of several units for measuring hardness of water, such as the English or Clark degree, the French degree, and the German degree.
(fluid mechanics)
One of the units in any of various scales of specific gravity, such as the Baumé scale.
(mathematics)
A unit for measurement of plane angles, equal to 1/360 of a complete revolution, or 1/90 of a right angle. Symbolized °.
For a term in one variable, the exponent of that variable.
For a term in several variables, the sum of the exponents of its variables.
For a polynomial, the degree of the highest-degree term.
For a differential equation, the greatest power to which the highest-order derivative occurs.
For an algebraic curve defined by the polynomial equation ƒ(x,y) = 0, the degree of the polynomial ƒ(x,y).
For a vertex in a graph, the number of arcs which have that vertex as an end point.
For an extension of a field, the dimension of the extension field as a vector space over the original field.
(thermodynamics)
One of the units of temperature or temperature difference in any of various temperature scales, such as the Celsius, Fahrenheit, and Kelvin temperature scales (the Kelvin degree is now known as the kelvin).

degree

1. A step, as of a stair.
2. A stair, or set of steps.

degree

The degree (or valency) of a node in a graph is the number of edges joined to it.
References in classic literature ?
You are partly crazy and partly imbecile; a ruin, a failure, as almost everybody is,--though some in less degree, or less perceptibly, than their fellows.
Situation, soil, climate, the nature of the productions, the nature of the government, the genius of the citizens, the degree of information they possess, the state of commerce, of arts, of industry, these circumstances and many more, too complex, minute, or adventitious to admit of a particular specification, occasion differences hardly conceivable in the relative opulence and riches of different countries.
For it cannot be presumed that the same degree of sound policy, prudence, and foresight would uniformly be observed by each of these confederacies for a long succession of years.
The latent causes of faction are thus sown in the nature of man; and we see them everywhere brought into different degrees of activity, according to the different circumstances of civil society.
At this point I think I hear some of my better educated readers exclaim, "How could you in Flatland know anything about angles and degrees, or minutes?
The temperature of the water at the surface showed twelve degrees, it was now only ten; we had gained two.
In journeying eastward he had gone towards the sun, and the days therefore diminished for him as many times four minutes as he crossed degrees in this direction.
I do not mean by this that one substance cannot be more or less truly substance than another, for it has already been stated' that this is the case; but that no single substance admits of varying degrees within itself.
In pursuit of the sperm whale, we had been cruising on the line some twenty degrees to the westward of the Gallipagos; and all that we had to do, when our course was determined on, was to square in the yards and keep the vessel before the breeze, and then the good ship and the steady gale did the rest between them.
There be three degrees of this hiding and veiling of a man's self.
This vast region is situated between the fifteenth and tenth degrees of north latitude; that is to say, that, in order to approach it, the explorer must penetrate fifteen hundred miles into the interior of Africa.
It was now but 140 degrees, although we had penetrated to a depth of nearly four miles.