Fahrenheit

(redirected from Degrees Fahrenheit)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

Fahrenheit

1
Gabriel Daniel . 1686--1736, German physicist, who invented the mercury thermometer and devised the temperature scale that bears his name

Fahrenheit

2
of or measured according to the Fahrenheit scale of temperature.
References in periodicals archive ?
Now try changing a temperature from degrees Fahrenheit to degrees Celsius.
Use an insulated cooler with sufficient ice or ice packs to keep the food at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below.
In the Younger Dryas period (named for an arctic wildflower whose remains were found, completely unexpectedly, in Denmark) 12,000 years ago, temperatures were dramatically colder, by about nine degrees Fahrenheit.
Using this method, the researchers said one area of the wafer was able to reach temperatures above 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit, while "another spot just a few micrometers away sat comfortably at [77 degrees Fahrenheit].
Climate: Average temperature is 82 degrees Fahrenheit (28 degrees Celsius)
The symptoms of heat stroke can vary, but may include any or all of the following: disorientation, an extremely high body temperature (above 103 degrees Fahrenheit orally), red, hot, dry skin, rapid, strong pulse, nausea and/or vomiting, throbbing headache, and unconsciousness.
Reuters, for example, featured a story on March 19th that claimed the Antarctic Peninsula had warmed by an astonishing 36 degrees Fahrenheit during the past half-century.
Three different microclimates were simulated in incubators at 50, 70, and 90 degrees Fahrenheit.
During heat season, owners of privately-owned multiple dwellings throughout the five boroughs are required by law to maintain an indoor temperature of at least 68 degrees Fahrenheit between 6 a.
Fever is likely to have a negative influence on early neonatal outcome if it is higher than 101 degrees Fahrenheit.
If you do cook meat on the overnight, it must reach a core temperature of 160 degrees Fahrenheit for at least 15 seconds.
In just the last 50 years, the temperature of downtown Los Angeles has increased by five degrees Fahrenheit.