Kelvin

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kelvin,

abbr. K, official name in the International System of UnitsInternational System of Units,
officially called the Système International d'Unités, or SI, system of units adopted by the 11th General Conference on Weights and Measures (1960). It is based on the metric system.
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 (SI) for the degree of temperature as measured on the Kelvin temperature scaleKelvin temperature scale,
a temperature scale having an absolute zero below which temperatures do not exist. Absolute zero, or 0°K;, is the temperature at which molecular energy is a minimum, and it corresponds to a temperature of −273.
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kelvin

(kel -vin) Symbol: K. The SI unit of temperature, equal to 1/273.16 of the thermodynamic temperature of the triple point of water. A temperature in kelvin may be converted to one in degrees Celsius (°C) by the subtraction of 273.15.

Kelvin

Standard unit for color temperature, abbreviated K. A Kelvin unit is the basis of all temperature measurement, starting with 0 K at absolute zero.

Kelvin

 

the unit of thermodynamic temperature, equal to 1/273.16 of the thermodynamic temperature of the triple point of water; designation K. It was named after W. Thomson (Lord Kelvin). Before 1968 it was called the degree Kelvin (°K). The kelvin is used as the unit of the International Practical Temperature Scale and is one of the fundamental units of the International System of Units. The kelvin is equal in magnitude to a degree Celsius (°C).

kelvin

[′kel·vən]
(electricity)
A name formerly given to the kilowatt-hour. Also known as thermal volt.
(thermodynamics)
A unit of absolute temperature equal to 1/273.16 of the absolute temperature of the triple point of water. Symbolized K. Formerly known as degree Kelvin.

kelvin (K)

The International Standard unit of temperature. Absolute zero equals 0°K = -273.16°C = 459.69°F. A temperature increase of 1°K is numerically equal to an increase of 1°C.

Kelvin

A thermometer scale starting at absolute zero (approximately −273°C) and having degrees of the same magnitude as those of the Celsius thermometer. Thus, 0°C = 273 K. Named after first Lord Kelvin (1824–1907). Also called an absolute scale.

kelvin

the basic SI unit of thermodynamic temperature; the fraction 1/273.16 of the thermodynamic temperature of the triple point of water.

Kelvin

William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin. 1824--1907, British physicist, noted for his work in thermodynamics, inventing the Kelvin scale, and in electricity, pioneering undersea telegraphy

Kelvin

A unit of measurement of temperature. Part of the SI system of measurement, the Kelvin (K) scale starts at absolute zero (-273.15). Each Kelvin degree is the same as a Celsius degree. As a result, 0ºC (freezing water) is equal to 273.15K, and 100ºC (boiling water) is equal to 373.15K. From British physicist and mathematician Lord William Thomas Kelvin (1824-1907). See color temperature and SI units.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because of his experiments, his fellow scientists decided to measure color "temperatures" in his name; the higher the value of the light in degrees Kelvin, the closer it is to sunlight.
These new ceramic materials--copper-oxides, or cuprates, combined with various other elements --achieve superconductivity at temperatures as high as 138 degrees Kelvin, representing a major jump toward room-temperature superconductors.
As a result the researchers obtained a clean sample with electrons at 17,000 degrees Kelvin whilst the ions remained at around room temperature of 300 degrees Kelvin.
From that, they got a temperature of about 300 degrees Kelvin, or 27 degrees C.
However, despite this basic similarity, the light sources differ in color temperature, as measured in degrees Kelvin.
250 degrees kelvin is almost room temperature in Siberia.
The dust in the cloud has been measured at about 550 degrees Kelvin, approximately twice as hot as the surface temperature on Earth.
The sun's surface is about 5,800 degrees Kelvin, or about 10,000 Fahrenheit.
So in 1990 a very prominent chemist said the temperature could never go above 160 degrees kelvin.
The researchers discovered the cells in ultraviolet emission lines formed at temperatures around one-million degrees Kelvin.
The planet is extremely close to its star -- its orbital radius is only about three times the radius of the star -- and the scientists have estimated that its surface temperatures may be as high as 3,000 degrees Kelvin, or more than 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit.
Because it is so close, the surface of this exoplanet is very hot, about 2000 degrees Kelvin.