dehydroepiandrosterone

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dehydroepiandrosterone

[dē¦hī·drō·e‚pē·ən′dräs·tə ‚rōn]
(organic chemistry)
C19H28O2 Dimorphous crystals with a melting point of 140-141°C, or leaflet crystals with a melting point of 152-153°C; soluble in alcohol, benzene, and ether; used as an androgen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prospective measurements of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate in a cohort of elderly subjects: relationship to gender, subjective health, smoking habits, and 10-year mortality.
9) Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, nmol/L 1183 (465, 2389) 1095 (484, 2483) Age at blood draw, years 62 (51, 68) 62 (50, 68) Current smokers 78 (32.
Administration of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate retards onset but not progression of autoimmune disease in NZB/W mice.
Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels are associated with more favorable cognitive function in women.
Effects of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate on carnitine acetyl transferase activity and carnitine levels in cophorectomized rats.
The plasma levels of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate are decreased in patients with chronic heart failure in proportion to the severity.
All had precocious puberty secondary to exaggerated adrenarche, high circulating levels of interleukin-6 and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and low adiponectin.
g], are as follows: 15%, 13%, and 12% for total cholesterol; 16%, 20%, and 49% for dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S); 3.
Comparative effects of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate on ventricular diastolic function with young and aged female mice.
001 for trend after adjustment for age, date of visit, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, blood cholesterol, cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, alcohol intake, physical activity, social class, education, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, androstanediol glucuronide, and sex hormone binding globulin).
Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) is the most plentiful adrenal steroid in human circulation, but scientists know very little about its function.