cell-mediated immunity

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cell-mediated immunity

[¦sel ¦mē·dē‚ād·əd i′myü·nəd·ē]
(immunology)
Immune responses produced by the activities of T cells rather than by immunoglobulins.
References in periodicals archive ?
Certain drugs that suppress the immune system, such as corticosteroids, can prevent a delayed-type hypersensitivity response to SPHERUSOL.
Immunopathogenesis of Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity Microscopy Research And Technique, 53: 241-245.
A triple assay technique for the evaluation of metal-induced, delayed-type hypersensitivity responses in patients with or receiving total joint arthroplasty.
Th1 cells secrete IL-2, IFN-[gamma], and lymphotoxin, and are primarily associated with macrophage activation and delayed-type hypersensitivity.
T-helper cells function in CMI as producers of cytokines, which mediate delayed-type hypersensitivity and support CTLs and which as such are critical components of the CMI responses to intracellular pathogens.
Strength of the immune system was measured by the skin response known as delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), along with measurement of antibodies to hepatitis B after being inoculated with hepatitis B vaccine.
Specifically, rhIL-7 blocks sepsis-induced depletion of CD4 and CD8 cells, enhances lymphocyte recruitment, prevents the sepsis-induced loss in immunity as evidenced by preserved delayed-type hypersensitivity response, does not exacerbate the proinflammatory response in sepsis, and clearly improves survival.
However, delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions have also been reported.
Using the guinea pig model, several researchers from 1950 through the 1980s used cutaneous application of beryllium salts and metal to confirm beryllium induction of a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response (Alekseeva 1965; Curtis 1951; Denham and Hall 1988; Jones and Amos 1974; Krivanek and Reeves 1972).
Thimerosal, a mercury-based preservative used in vaccines for several types of viruses, can cause delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions when applied to skin.