Delta Cephei


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Delta Cephei

(see -fee-ÿ) See Cepheid variables.

Delta Cephei

[′del·tə ′sef·ē‚ī]
(astronomy)
A cepheid variable, from which the name of this type of star is derived; it has a period of 5.3 days.
References in periodicals archive ?
Examples of this behaviour are classified as delta Cephei, RR Lyrae and delta Scuti stars according to their position in the H-R diagram and the nature of their variation.
The star in the study is Delta Cephei, which is the namesake for the entire class of Cepheids and was discovered in 1784.
I wrote about Delta Cephei in last October's installment of this column.
It is also home to two important variable stars; delta Cephei, prototype of the Cepheid variables, and mu Cephei, the semi-regular Garnet Star named by Sir William Herschel and one of the reddest naked eye stars in the sky (although this is totally lost on the colour-blind Director).
John Coodricke discovered the variability of Delta Cephei, the prototype of the class, in 1784.
Delta Cephei is a yellow-giant star that changes from magnitude 3.
Extended cocoons of gas resolved around the Cepheid variables Polaris and Delta Cephei suggest a connection between these stars' pulsations and the shedding of mass, with far-reaching implications.
Using the Very Large Telescope Interferometer in Chile and the CHARA Array on California's Mount Wilson, an international team resolved infrared cocoons around Polaris, Delta Cephei, and L Carinae.
Though the archetype Cepheid variable, Delta Cephei, lies too far north for most Southern Hemisphere observers, a good substitute rides high on the meridian at this time of year: Kappa (k) Pavonis.
It is a Cepheid variable, meaning it belongs to the important class named after Delta Cephei.
Even our variable-star friends need to be watched carefully to sense any alteration in their patterns - Delta Cephei pulsing every 5.
Because Delta Cephei is the prototype, many books and articles state that it was the first Cepheid found.