demand

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Related to Demand elasticity: Price elasticity of demand, Supply Elasticity

demand

1. Economics
a. willingness and ability to purchase goods and services
b. the amount of a commodity that consumers are willing and able to purchase at a specified price
2. Law a formal legal claim, esp to real property

demand

[də′mand]
(electricity)

demand

1. The electric load on a system, integrated over a specific time interval; usually expressed in watts or kilowatts.
2. The volume of gas per unit time (usually expressed in cubic feet per hour or liters per second) or the amount of heat (usually expressed in Btu per hour or megajoules per hour) required for the operation of one or more gas appliances.
3. The rate of flow of water, usually expressed in gallons per minute (liters per second), furnished by a water supply system to various types of plumbing fixtures and water outlets under normal conditions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Existing reviews of actual excise tax rate influences on soda consumption have featured too narrow a range of tax rates to yield evidence of demand elasticity (e.
On Indexed Bonds and Aggregate Demand Elasticity," Atlantic Economic Journal, 37: 17-21.
We find an increase in demand elasticity compared to models including prices or price instruments only.
FHWA developed the tool to accommodate outcomes from consumer surplus models, where the practitioner (the model user) explicitly accounts for induced demand using standard estimates for transportation demand elasticity.
4) The export demand elasticity for commodity exports is -3.
Given this hypothesis concerning the political economy of choice between the two major forms of excise taxes, the results of this paper make testable predictions with respect to how the relative desirability of ad valorem taxation (from the perspective of producers) changes with several important characteristics of a market: the elasticity of substitution among goods in the market, the market demand elasticity, the number of firms in the market, and the level of taxation in the market.
The relation in equation (3) involves only the demand elasticity for the market as a whole since, by assumption, there is only one seller.
Work by De Leeuw and Nkanta (1971) suggests a demand elasticity in the range of -1.
Their relationship to customer satisfaction and their impact on price and demand elasticity is becoming more important on a world-wide basis.
Poppel says specific steps include building demand elasticity, as well as internal and competitive costing.
By integrating building operations with energy markets, CUE's proprietary software leverages a building's thermal mass, environmental data, carbon emissions and electric market prices to reduce HVAC energy use and expense (up to 30 percent), to improve electric generation efficiency and environmental performance, and to introduce demand elasticity into grid markets.
Research based on behavioral economic concepts has focused, predominantly, on demand elasticity (cf.