Democratic People's Republic of Korea Founding Day

Democratic People's Republic of Korea Founding Day

September 9
The founding of North Korea (official name: Democratic People's Republic of Korea) on September 9, 1948, is observed throughout the country as a national holiday. The whole of the Korean peninsula (i.e., present-day North and South Korea) was under the control of Japan from 1910 until the end of World War II. When Japan surrendered in August 1945, the U.S.S.R took control of the northern half of the peninsula, while the southern half came under control of the United States. Despite attempts to unify the two regions, by 1948 it was clear that their sharp political differences made reunification impossible. On August 15, 1949, the Republic of Korea was established in the south. Less than a month later, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, under the leadership of then-Premier Kim Il-Sung, was founded in the North.
Much of the observance of North Korea's founding day centers on adulating Kim Il-Sung, the founding leader. This is true of many of the political holidays in North Korea, reflecting the "cult of personality" that was a facet of Kim's distinctive political philosophy. The main public celebrations take place in the capital city, Pyongyang, and can include such events as government banquets in the late Kim's honor, political meetings, concerts, and displays of song and dance. Officials and citizens also lay flowers before the monuments to Kim in the capital. Similar displays and flower-laying also take place in towns and cities throughout North Korea.
CONTACTS:
Permanent Representative of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea to the United Nations
820 Second Ave.
New York, NY 10017
212-972-3105; fax: 212-972-3154
www.korea-dpr.com
Full browser ?