democrat

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democrat

1. an advocate of democracy; adherent of democratic principles
2. a member or supporter of a democratic party or movement

Democrat

(in the US) a member or supporter of the Democratic Party
References in classic literature ?
It was well for their venerable brotherhood that the new Surveyor was not a politician, and though a faithful Democrat in principle, neither received nor held his office with any reference to political services.
1837; (Italy) 1838; The American Democrat, 1838; Homeward Bound, 1838; The Chronicles of Cooperstown, 1838; Home as Found (Eve Effingham),
The situation will be infinitely worse if the Democrats refuse to stand against the tide.
This year, however, for Democrats and Republicans alike, it's becoming an increasingly tough sell.
If this is the year Democrats break an almost three-decade-long losing streak and win the Illinois governor's mansion, the changing political and racial landscape in the five counties that surround Chicago and Cook County might be the key.
Four days later, on May 16, Rangel, the ranking Democrat on the Ways and Means Committee and an influential member of the Congressional Black Caucus, went public with his decision, prompting several other wavering Democrats to join him.
NEW YORK -- Differences between Democrats and Republicans go far beyond their political views, according to THE HOPELESSLY PARTISAN GUIDE TO AMERICAN POLITICS (SelectBooks Publishing, NYC).
Perhaps most tellingly, when Bush and the Republicans led a last-ditch defense of their congressional majority with millions of dollars in ads charging that Democrats would raise taxes, it had no impact.
While Democrats were gaining control of Congress, Antelope Valley voters re-elected a longtime Republican congressman, helped send a new Republican to the neighboring congressional seat, and re-elected two Republicans to the state Assembly, where Antelope Valley voters last sent a Democrat 30 years ago.
As the President's poll numbers sink, and Congressional Republicans look over their shoulders, the Democrats are feeling better and better about the upcoming midterm elections.
Over the past few generations, congressional Democrats could customarily be relied upon to promote a liberal agenda while their Republican counterparts developed the reputation of being stalwart opponents of our nation's slide into big government and internationalism.