Demos

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Demos

 

in its broad sense, the designation of the free population of the ancient Greek city-states, who had full rights as citizens (differentiated from slaves, metics, Perioeci, and other categories of dependents and others who were not fully enfranchised). Demos originally referred to a people or region, but as early as the Homeric (11th to ninth centuries B.C.) and archaic (eighth to sixth centuries B.C.) periods, the term was used to designate the common people (primarily the rural population), as opposed to the hereditary aristocracy, the eupatridae. In the sixth and fifth centuries B.C., demos came to include part of the urban population (craftsmen and merchants). Later, from the end of the fifth century and in the fourth, demos referred to the poor (primarily urban) section of the population.

References in periodicals archive ?
On any law of averages, these cannot have been universally resented by everyone in the allied demoi.
In this highly persuasive account of transnational democracy, James Bohman focuses on extending the political subject from a unitary people, the demos, to plural and overlapping demoi.
Rejecting the model of an expanding and increasingly global, unitary demos, Bohman argues that multiple, overlapping demoi are a better context for the realization of nondomination.
However, this worry seems misplaced, since a "republican cosmopolitan" world state could conceivably be modeled on a multinational state, such as Belgium or Switzerland, consisting of several coexisting demoi.
101-16; and James Bohman, Democracy Across Borders: From Demos to Demoi (Cambridge, Mass.
Third, I apply this conception to the political form of a transnational polity, in which citizens enjoy the democratic minimum as members of various constituencies, or demoi.
The institutions that organize the polity into subunits, each with its own demoi, may currently be unable to provide the opportunities for the self-development of all their members that are requisite for the full use of their rights of membership.
THE DEMOCRATIC CIRCLE REVISITED: CONTROL, DOMINATION, AND THE DEMOI PROBLEM