Demuth, Charles

Demuth, Charles

(dā`mo͞oth), 1883–1935, American watercolor painter, b. Lancaster, Pa. At the age of 20 he began his art study under William Chase at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. In 1907 and again in 1912, Demuth visited Europe. On returning to the United States he began a series of line-and-wash illustrations for works of Zola, Poe, and Henry James and made drawings of vaudeville performers. He is perhaps best known for his beautiful translucent flower and fruit studies in watercolor. Demuth was one of the first painters to draw inspiration from the geometric shapes of machines and modern technology. There are several works by him in the Art Institute, Chicago, and many in the Columbus Gallery of Fine Arts, Ohio.

Bibliography

See biography by E. Farnham (1971) and A. L. Eiseman (1986).

Demuth, Charles

(1883–1935) painter; born in Lancaster, Pa. He worked in water colors and studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts under Thomas Anshutz (1905–08), at the Académie Julian, Paris (1912–14), and lived in New York City. From 1910–14 he painted illustrations for several writers, including Emile Zola and Henry James. Lame and diabetic, he illustrated the joys of physical life, as in Circus Riders (1916), and Acrobats (1919). His later work was a combination of cubism and realism, as in the grain elevators of My Egypt (1927).
References in periodicals archive ?
Important early-twentieth-century artists such as Charles Demuth, Charles Sheeler and Paul Manship have received full-scale historical treatment only in the past few years.