Den


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den

1. the habitat or retreat of a lion or similar wild animal; lair
2. Scot a small wooded valley; dingle
3. Scot and northern English dialect a place of sanctuary in certain catching games; home or base

Den’

 

(Day), a bourgeois, left-liberal daily newspaper published in Petrograd from 1912 to 1918. Among its contributors were bourgeois radicals (A. V. Amfiteatrov and N. P. Asheshov), Narodniks (Populists) and Socialist Revolutionaries (V. Bogucharskii, R. V. Ivanov-Razumnik, and S. D. Mstislavskii), and Menshevik-liquidators (D. I. Zaslavskii, St. Ivanovich, N. I. Iordanskii, and P. S. Iushkevich). The newspaper criticized tsarism and the bourgeois-pome shchik (landlord) parties from the liberal Menshevik position. During World War I it occupied a defensist position. After May 30 (June 12), 1917, Den’ became an organ of the Mensheviks. It supported the bourgeois Provisional Government and opposed the Bolsheviks. The newspaper reacted with hostility to the October Socialist Revolution. It was closed on Oct. 26 (Nov. 8), 1917, by the Petrograd Military Revolutionary Committee but for some time continued to publish under different names. It was finally closed in May 1918 for anti-Soviet propaganda.


Den

 

the place where some mammals rest for a long time, hibernate, or raise their cubs. A den, unlike a burrow, is on the surface and usually in a secluded spot: in thick underbrush, among reeds, in a gully, beneath a cliff, or in a cave. Jackals, foxes, wolves, hyenas, tigers, lions, and wild boars build dens. A bear’s den is called berloga in Russian; a den occupied briefly is called lezhka. The latter is built by hares, rodents, and most ungulates.

den

An indoor retreat, usually small, for work or leisure. also see chamber, 1.

DEN

(Directory Enabled Networks) The management of a network from a central depository of information about users, applications and network resources. Originally an initiative from Microsoft and Cisco, DEN was turned over to the DMTF in 1998, and its extensions were made part of the CIM specification in 1999. See WBEM, CIM and DMTF.
References in classic literature ?
Come saints --and sinners, hear me tell,' and den down he'd go,"--and Mose imitated precisely the nasal tones of the old man, tumbling on the floor, to illustrate the supposed catastrophe.
Tradition says she spent the last two years of her life in the strange den I have been speaking of, after having indulged herself in one final, triumphant, and satisfying spree.
Still, we waited in that place a day, thinking that, perhaps, the lioness would return to her den and that, at least, we might kill her.
But the Leader of the Lions, when he got back to his den, saw his wife, the Queen Lioness, come running out to meet him with her hair untidy.
The coarse brawl, the loathsome den, the crude violence of disordered life, the very vileness of thief and outcast, were more vivid, in their intense actuality of impression, than all the gracious shapes of art, the dreamy shadows of song.
I took it, and began gnawing it, as serenely as possible, in spite of a certain trepidation and the nearly intolerable closeness of the den.
The prisoners, in their expressive language, have named it the "Lions' Den," probably because the captives possess teeth which frequently gnaw the bars, and sometimes the keepers also.
Everything in this den is comfortable and convenient, and I have, as I say, a window to myself.
Den he would pull me away-dis great, dark devil, mit his enormous paws~hush as if I was a child.
Look thy den is hid and deep, Lest a wrong, by thee forgot, Draw thy killer to the spot.
resumed the voice, as I continued my survey, "you mus pe so dronk as de pig, den, for not zee me as I zit here at your zide.
She had the surest information that of late he had, when the fit was on him, made use of an opium den in the farthest east of the City.