Dendrobatinae

Dendrobatinae

[‚den·drō′bat·ən·ē]
(vertebrate zoology)
A subfamily of anuran amphibians in the family Ranidae, including the colorful poisonous frogs of Central and South America.

Dendrobatinae

 

a subfamily of amphibians of the family Brachycephalidae. The Dendrobatinae measure 2-4 cm. At the tip of each digit are two triangular dermal scutes. In most species the extremities have no webs. There are three genera—Dendrobates proper, Phyllobates, and Hyloxalus —which together number over 30 species. The Dendrobatinae are found in the northern part of South America and in Central America. They dwell chiefly in forests, usually on the shores of bodies of water. The males transfer the tadpoles, which adhere to their backs, from the place where the eggs are laid into the water. The secretions of the cutaneous glands are poisonous and were used by Indians to prime their arrows.