dendroclimatology


Also found in: Wikipedia.

dendroclimatology

[‚den·drō‚kiī·mə′täl·ə·jē]
(meteorology)
The study of the tree-ring record to reconstruct climate history, based on the fact that temperature, precipitation, and other climatic variables affect tree growth.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
On the average value of correlated time series, with applications in dendroclimatology and hydrometeorology.
Dendroclimatology, the use of tree rings as a proxy for thermometer readings, is inherently an imprecise science to begin with, fraught with many uncertainties.
These included a cross- section of a 704- year- old Deodar tree trunk along with exhibits of wood anatomy, seasoning and dendroclimatology.
The prefix dendro is used with the name of particular scientific discipline, so the Dendroclimatology refer to Dendrochronological Investigation of past and future climate, application of tree-ring analysis to the mapping of past and present climatic or in simple words "study of present and past climate from tree-ring is know a Dendroclimatology "
Key words: dendroclimatology, forest-tundra, Churchill, ring-width, Picea glauca, Picea mariana, Larix laricina, Wapusk National Park, response-function.
Tree rings of Scots pine have been successfully used in dendroclimatology, mainly regarding trees growing on dry soils.
Although the field is less than a century old, there are now scientists who study dendroclimatology, dendrovolcanology, dondropyrochronology, dendrochemistry.
Within the last 30 years, dendroclimatology has become a major tool in the reconstruction of climates over the last millennium in many areas of the world (see Hughes (2002) for a comprehensive review).
The Tree Rings' Tale: Understanding Our Changing Climate" is the history of dendroclimatology, the science of tree rings.
Comparatively few studies have considered the dendroclimatology of Scots pine growing on pristine peatlands or peatlands showing small signs of anthropogenic activities (Zalitis & Bambe, 1991; Stravinskiene & Juknys, 1998; Linderholm, 2001; Linderholm et al.
Multiple stable isotopes from oak trees in southwestern Scotland and the potential for stable isotope dendroclimatology in maritime climatic regions.