Fluorosis

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Fluorosis

 

a chronic disease caused by prolonged excessive ingestion of fluorine. The consumption of water with a high fluorine concentration (more than 1–1.2 mg/liter) or food with an excessive quantity of fluoride compounds results in the retention of fluorine salts in bones and dental tissues and the replacement of soluble calcium compounds by the insoluble compounds of calcium and fluorine. Fluorosis is manifested by the appearance of stains on dental enamel and by a change in the structure of bony tissue (osteosclerosis), causing bone deformity and calcification of ligaments. When contact with fluorine is terminated, symptoms of fluorosis decrease.

References in periodicals archive ?
This was immediately presumed to be due to dental fluorosis as a result of probable excessively high levels of fluoride in the drinking water on the island of Brava.
The UK Government's own study found 48pc of children in Newcastle suffering from dental fluorosis and in cavalier fashion dismissed it as a cosmetic issue.
shows about twice the incidence of dental fluorosis (the first, most visible sign of fluoride chronic toxicity) as seen in non-fluoridated Kingston.
Dental fluorosis occurs during tooth formation and becomes visible during eruption of the teeth.
Prevalence of dental caries and dental fluorosis in areas with negligible, optimal, and above-optimal fluoride concentrations in drinking water.
Like EPA, the Chicago-based American Dental Association sees dental fluorosis as "a cosmetic problem, not a health problem," according to Lisa Watson, ADA's director for fluoridation and preventive dentistry.
HHS and EPA reached an understanding of the latest science on fluoride and its effect on tooth decay prevention and the development of dental fluorosis that may occur with excess fluoride consumption during the tooth forming years, age 8 and younger.
Public Health Service have known that Blacks are disproportionately harmed by fluoride with higher rates of dental fluorosis (permanent damage to the enamel) rates compared to Whites.
5) Dental fluorosis also has mild to severe consequences, and animal studies show that there is a genetic component in the pathogenesis of dental fluorosis and in bone response to fluoride exposure.
One part per million (ppm) of fluoride in drinking water - the so-called optimal level at which dental fluorosis was ex-pected to be very mild - has been reduced independently by several fluoridating countries, including Hong Kong, Canada and Ireland, because at 1ppm, the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis became unacceptable.
Fluoride concentration beyond the prescribed norms causes dental fluorosis in children and neurological complications," he adds.
Although the use of dentifrices containing fluoride (F) has significantly contributed to a decrease in the prevalence of dental caries in the last decades, they may be a risk factor for the development of dental fluorosis in young children due to the high rate of F ingestion during tooth brushing [Mascarenhas, 2000].