mandible

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Related to Dentary: incus, Dentary Bone

mandible

1. the lower jawbone in vertebrates
2. either of a pair of mouthparts in insects and other arthropods that are usually used for biting and crushing food
3. Ornithol either the upper or the lower part of the bill, esp the lower part

mandible

[′man·də·bəl]
(anatomy)
The bone of the lower jaw.
The lower jaw.
(invertebrate zoology)
Any of various mouthparts in many invertebrates designed to hold or bite into food.
References in periodicals archive ?
9)% HL; teeth 5-10 on ocular-side premaxilla, 20-27 on blind-side premaxilla and 10-12 on ocular-side dentary, 23-29 on blindside dentary; gill rakers of first arch typically broad and robust, 6-11 total, 1-4 on upper arch, 5-7 on lower; gill rakers of second arch 6-11 total, 1 on upper and 5-10 on lower arch; dorsal orbit larger than eye length, orbit length 23.
Both the maxilla and palatine bear teeth whose crowns have bulbous bases, a single tall cusp, and an anterior (mesial) 'heel' whereas the dentary teeth have the reverse configuration with a tall cusp and a posterior (distal) 'heel' Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Teraterpeton hrynewichorum is most closely related to Trilophosaurus spp.
Additionally, Carraway's (2010) measurements numbered 22, 23, 24, 25, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, and 34 are measurable in the single Terapa dentary fragment.
Viewed laterally, the rostrodorsal edge of the supra-angular articulates with the caudolateral edge of the coronoid and the rostrolateral edge invests the dentary (Figures 2A and B).
Peter Carrington kindly photographed the giant beaver dentary.
The changes ill the anatomy of the jaws that took place as mammal-like reptiles evolved into mammals were characterized by an increase in the size of the temporalis muscle and the dentary bone and a reduction in the size of the postdentary bones (i.
As a result, facial features were characterized by a narrow face with a wide mouth and robust dentary tooth row.
The most common tetrapod fossils are teeth referable to small ornithischians and possible theropods, followed by bones and osteoderms of Protosuchus, and bones of cynodont therapsids including a tritylodontid dentary and limb bones.
anisitsa maxilla of moderate length, reaching to pupil's level, with 2 broad pen-tacuspid teeth; dentary with 5 broad pentacuspid teeth in front, followed by a series of minute teeth laterally; a conspicuous triangular humeral spot close to the opercle; a conspicuous spot almost the entire depth of the caudal peduncle, with a black line on the middle caudal rays.