Deontology

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Deontology

 

a branch of ethics that deals with the problem of duty. The term was introduced by the English utilitarian philosopher J. Bentham, who used the term to denote a theory of morality in general (Deontology, or the Science of Morals, vols. 1–2, 1834).

References in periodicals archive ?
This also means that Plato/Socrates' theories of virtue, Kant's deontological ethics and Bentham or Mill's teleological theories outlined and discussed above cannot alone lead to ethical fitness.
It is, in Thomas Kuhn's sense, a paradigm shift and has led and will lead to a struggle of minds and morals between those committed to the older deontological ethics and those committed to the renewed virtue ethics.
Likewise, to generate the teleological ethics scores, a response to each of the 21 ethics questions was assigned a "1" if the response indicated agreement with teleological ethics and a "0" if the response indicated agreement with deontological ethics.
A second reason is that, all too often, theorists of globalization, philosophers, and theologians divide up the world and life into distinct and manageable bits--for example, the difference between economic, political, and ideological global dynamics, or the difference between a virtue ethics and a deontological ethics.
It probes the non-consequentialist's perspective or deontological ethics, which highlights Finding the appropriate principle(s) of morality to guide ethical acts through doing one's duty rather than having an inclination.
The exemplary advocate of secular deontological ethics is Immanuel
Rule-based thinking is deontological ethics, associated with Immanuel Rant (1724-1804).