Deontology


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Deontology

 

a branch of ethics that deals with the problem of duty. The term was introduced by the English utilitarian philosopher J. Bentham, who used the term to denote a theory of morality in general (Deontology, or the Science of Morals, vols. 1–2, 1834).

References in periodicals archive ?
Rule deontology is perhaps best exemplified by familiar maxim "do unto others as you would have others do unto you.
Since, in qualified deontology, presumptive priority is given to deontological interests, we can postulate that Justice Sharpe's own deontological moral outlook motivated him to engage in legal development of the common law in order to accommodate a remedy for the plaintiff.
Conger and Categories Presents a taxonomy of Loch (2001) information ethics concerns: : ownership, responsibility, privacy, and access Mingers and Basis Presents approaches to the Walsham consideration of ethical issues: (2010) consequentialism deontology, virtue ethics, and discourse ethics Smith Basis Presents approaches to (2002) consideration of ethical issues as rule based versus consequentialist Ellis and Basis Present alternative ethical Griffith (2001) approaches, equity, relativism, and contractualism and show that these may operate independently in particular scenarios Goles et al.
59) But Prudential J could have added that his approach to accident compensation is a mixture of consequentialism and deontology.
By Rawls's usage, most if not all of the theories contributing to American natural-rights morality are deontological--but they reject the terms of Rawls's definition in ways that anticipate and finesse the deontology trap.
This hollow modern dialectic between deontology and utilitarianism seems finally to derive, according to Brague, from an earlier, properly theological severing of Law and Counsel, that is, the late medieval and nominalist "long-term shift to the primacy of the will.
Deontology does not direct the agent to undertake whatever means are necessary to reach a desirable goal.
The Multidimensional Ethics Scale is used to elicit a moral evaluation of each potentially unethical situation within the philosophical constructs of justice, deontology, utilitarianism, relativism, egoism, and compassion.
A third major tradition of thought about ethics in the Western tradition is deontology.
Indeed, deontology captures the notions fundamental to moral reasoning that moral principles originate beyond nature and that nature must therefore conform to them, rather than they to nature.
By midsemester, students used their cultural understanding to engage in content on ethics, including discussion and practice with the two predominant ethical theories of utilitarianism and deontology and four primary ethical principles: beneficence (above all, do good), autonomy (right to freely choose until one influences the right of others), nonmaleficence (above all, do no harm), and justice (to each an equal share) as related to the Code of Ethics for Nurses (33).
Another approach, deontology, takes into consideration universal and generalized moral principles, independent of the consequences of possible actions.