Deoxyribose


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Related to Deoxyribose: phosphodiester bond

Deoxyribose

A nucleic acid constituent (see illustration) of all animal, microbial, and plant cells; also known as 2- d -deoxyribose. Deoxyribose is enzymically formed in living cells by reduction of ribonucleoside di- or triphosphate. The four deoxyribose nucleotides, containing adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine, are the major constituents of the deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA), which control the hereditary characteristics of every living organism. See Deoxyribonucleic acid (dna), Nucleic acid, Ribose

Formulas of 2- D -deoxyribose (α- D -2-deoxyribofuranose)enlarge picture
Formulas of 2- D -deoxyribose (α- D -2-deoxyribofuranose)

Deoxyribose

 

a carbohydrate belonging to the deoxy-sugars. Part of the deoxyribonucleic acids, it consists of crystals and has a molecular weight of 134.1 and a melting point of 78°-82° C. Its structural formula is

deoxyribose

[dē¦äk·sē′rī‚bōs]
(biochemistry)
C5H10O4 A pentose sugar in which the hydrogen replaces the hydroxyl groups of ribose; a major constituent of deoxyribonucleic acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
1987, "The deoxyribose method: A simple test tube assay for determination of rate constants for reaction of OH radicals," Anal.
Molecular structure of nucleic acids, a structure for deoxyribose nucleic acid.
ulmoides leaf extracts exhibited inhibitory effects on oxidative damage in biomolecules such as deoxyribose and DNA as induced by Fenton reaction (Hsieh and Yen 2000) and it possesses inhibitory effects on the oxidative modification of LDL induced by [Cu.
Each nucleotide contains one base, one phosphate molecule, and the sugar molecule deoxyribose.
Newton's Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica and Watson and Crick's A Structure for Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid come quickly to mind.
Nucleotides are composed of phosphate groups, a five-sided sugar molecule (ribose sugars in RNA and deoxyribose sugars in DNA), and nitrogen-containing bases.
The total figure is for one of each base, four deoxyribose molecules and four phosphate bonds.
They have been analyzed to contain various materials of biological interest--amino acids that are present in free as well as in peptide combination, (19,23,25) nucleic acid bases as purines as well as pyrimidines, (23,26) sugars as ribose as well as deoxyribose, (19) and phospholipid-like material (27) in them.
Nucleic acids contain phosphoric acid, sugars such as deoxyribose in DNA and ribose in RNA, and organic bases such as adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine or uracil.
While conventional probes are built on a backbone of deoxyribose and phosphate, those built with Boston Probe's patented technology have a peptide backbone.
Crick (1953), "A Structure for Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid," Nature, 171(4356):737-738.