Death in Venice

(redirected from Der Tod in Venedig)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Death in Venice

aging successful author loses his lifelong self-discipline in his love for a beautiful Polish boy. [Ger. Lit: Death in Venice]
References in periodicals archive ?
Ritchie Robertson writes that in Der Tod in Venedig Mann comments on the unstable relation between art and desire through the protagonist.
In the study at hand I explore the effect of Oscar Wilde's trials for acts of "gross indecency"--which according to Alan Sinfield assisted in shaping an effeminate homosexual image-- on Mann's Der Tod in Venedig, by examining how ambivalence, elusive perception, and unreliable narration allow the reader to reevaluate the role of the Wildean dandy-aesthete figures in the novella.
Der Tod in Venedig is undoubtedly an ambivalent response to Wilde's legacy, yet the equivocalness of the portrayals of the queer characters permits an affirmative reading of the themes of same-sex desire, decadence, aestheticism, rebellion, effeminacy, and death.