Derby

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Derby

(där`bē, dûr`–), city and unitary authority (1991 pop. 218,026), central England, on the Derwent River. It was formerly county seat of DerbyshireDerbyshire
county (1991 pop. 915,000), 1,016 sq mi (2,632 sq km), central England. The county seat is Matlock; Derby, the former county seat, is now administratively independent of the county.
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 but became administratively independent of the county in 1997. Manufactures include automobiles and airplane engines, pottery (see Derby wareDerby ware
, English china produced at Derby since about 1750, when William Duesbury opened a pottery there. The china was close in style to contemporary Chelsea ware and Bow ware, whose factories Derby absorbed in the 1770s.
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), synthetic textiles, beer, machinery, and chemicals. The city is also an important rail center. Derby was a Roman settlement and, in the 9th cent., one of the Five Boroughs of the Danes. England's first silk mill was built there in 1718. Derby is the birthplace of the philosopher Herbert SpencerSpencer, Herbert,
1820–1903, English philosopher, b. Derby. In 1848 he moved to London, where he was an editor at The Economist and wrote his first major book, Social Statics (1851), which tried to establish a natural basis for political action.
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. Noteworthy are the Cathedral of All Saints, with its Perpendicular tower (1509–27), the Roman Catholic Church of St. Mary (designed by A. W. PuginPugin, Augustus Charles
, 1762–1832, English writer on medieval architecture, b. France. His writings and drawings furnished a mass of working material for the architects of the Gothic revival. Among them is Specimens of Gothic Architecture (2 vol., 1821–23).
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 in 1838), the arboretum, the chapel of St. Mary of the Bridge, and a grammar school founded in 1160. The Univ. of Derby and a teacher-training college are also located in Derby.

Derby

(dûr`bē), city (1990 pop. 12,199), New Haven co., SW Conn., at the confluence of the Naugatuck and Housatonic rivers, opposite Shelton; founded 1642 as a trading post, inc. as a city 1893. Its copper industry and pin manufactures date from the 1830s.

Derby

(där`bē), English horse race, instituted (1780) by the 12th earl of Derby and held annually at Epsom Downs, near London. The race is open only to three-year-old colts and fillies that must be entered when yearlings. The original course is still used; it is one yard longer than one and one-half miles. Hundreds of thousands of spectators view the race each year. Other well-known races, notably the Kentucky Derby (dûr`bē), held each year since 1875 at Churchill Downs, Louisville, Ky., have been named for the English classic.

Derby

 

a country town in Great Britain, on the Derwent River. Administrative center of the county of Derbyshire. Population, 220,000 (1970). It is a railroad junction and has railroad workshops. Automobiles and aircraft are manufactured, and there are other branches of transport machine building. It has a textile industry (cotton, silk, and chemical-fiber cloth), and there is production of knitted, lace, and leather goods and porcelain articles. There are specimens of architecture of the 14th to 19th century (St. Peter’s Church, Town Hall, and the cathedral). It has an art gallery.


Derby

 

a horse-racing event of purebred three-year-old Thoroughbreds over a distance of 2,400 m (on foreign racetracks, 2,414 m, or 1.5 miles). The derbies were initiated by Lord Derby in 1778 in England and were introduced in Russia in 1886. In the USSR derby competitions are known as the All-Union Grand Prix. In a number of countries, the USSR included, the term is also applied to the season’s main event for four-year-old trotters and in the Federal Republic of Germany, to the leading steeplechase.

derby

[′dər·bē]
(metallurgy)
A large, usually cylindrical piece of primary metal, whose weight may exceed 100 pounds (45 kilograms), formed by bomb reduction.

darby, derby slicker

1. A float tool used in plastering, either wood or metal, about 4 in. (10 cm) wide and about 42 in. (approx. 1 m) long, with two handles; used to float or level the plaster base coat prior to application of the finish coat, or to level the plaster finish coat before floating or troweling.
2. A hand-manipulated straightedge usually 3 to 8 ft (1 to 2.5 m) long, used in the early-stage leveling operations of concrete finishing to supplement floating.

Derby

classic annual race at Epsom Downs. [Br. Cult.: Brewer Dictionary, 276]

Derby

1
Earl of. title of Edward George Geoffrey Smith Stanley. 1799--1869, British statesman; Conservative prime minister (1852; 1858--59; 1866--68)

Derby

2
1. the. an annual horse race run at Epsom Downs, Surrey, since 1780: one of the English flat-racing classics
2. any of various other horse races
3. local Derby a football match between two teams from the same area

Derby

1. a city in central England, in Derby unitary authority, Derbyshire: engineering industries (esp aircraft engines and railway rolling stock); university (1991). Pop.: 229 407 (2001)
2. a unitary authority in central England, in Derbyshire. Pop.: 233 200 (2003 est.). Area: 78 sq. km (30 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
Teams: 1 Warwicks 113, 2 Derbys 106, 3 S Yorks 102, 4 Humber 79, 5 Notts 77, 6 Lincs 67.
Trainer Ron Ellis made the announcement a day after Don't Get Mad was assured a spot in the 20-horse Derby because of the withdrawal of injured Consolidator.
Derby added, "Datrons Board has fulfilled its fiduciary obligations in good faith by accepting a firm offer from Titan rather than risking the repetition of L-3s previous behavior on an expression of interest that was deemed to be speculative and subject to contingencies.
MARTIN GUPTILL took full advantage of Glamorgan's generosity to score his second century of the season and put Derbyshire in a strong position on the second day of the County Championship match at Derby.
Derbys 274 & 220-5; Lord's: Glam 505 & 278-8dec drew with Midd 414-8 dec & 94-3 Friends Provident Trophy (Group A) - Belfast: Worcs 180-8 bt Ireland 128-9 by 52 runs; Grace Road: Leics 238-6 lost to Hants 242-6 by 4 wkts; Northampton: Northants 240 lost to Lancs 241-4 by 6 wkts (Group B) Lord's: Middlesex 302-7 bt Scotland 140 by 162 runs; (Taunton) Somerset 291-3 bt Kent 181 by 110 runs; (Group C) Bristol: Gloucs 268-9 bt Surrey 140 by 128 runs; Headingley: Yorkshire 227-5 (MP Vaughan 82, GL Brophy 68 no) bt Sussex 213 (TT Bresnan 4-35) by 14 runs; (Group D) Derby: Glamorgan 205-9 lost to Derbys 206-6 by 4 wkts TOMORROW'S FIXTURES LV County Championship, Division One: Somerset v Durham, Yorkshire v Worcs.
A - Bob Baffert has been as blessed as any trainer in the country the past six years when it comes to talented 3-year-olds, winning four Santa Anita Derbys and leaving his mark on Churchill Downs with two Kentucky Derby victories.
SUMMARIES: LV County Championship - Div One Emirates Durham ICG Warwicks 472 v Durham 62-3 Liverpool Lancs 225 & 55-2 v Notts 261 Northampton Somset 375 & 249-8 dec v Northants 221 & 108-5 Div Two Cheltenham Gloucs 304-6 v Derbys Colchester Hants 246 v Essex 70-1 New Road Worcs 321 & 48-2 v Leics 280 TODAY: (11.
10100 3 0 3 Results: week one: Durham bt Somerset by 48 runs, Middx bt Notts by 10 wkts, Warks drew with Derbys, Sussex bt Yorks by an innings and 12 runs; week two: Middx beat Derbys by 9 wkts, Surrey drew with Somerset, Warks bt Durham by 318 runs.
He also sexually abused a student of Alfreton Grange Arts College, Derbys, where he worked for 35 years before being fired.
SUMMARIES: LV County Championship - Div One Liverpool Lancs 250 v Warwicks 68-5 Lord's Midds 132-5 v Durham Trent Bridge Notts 162 v Somset 78-1 Kia Oval Surrey 123-7 v Worcs Div Two Derby Leics 318-7 v Derbys SWALEC Stadium Glam 103-9 dec & 73-3 v Hamps 156 Canterbury Gloucs 255 v Kent 119-6 Headingley Yorks 246 v Essex 72-5 TODAY: (11.
Pervert Bretton Wood, 44, of Swanwick, Derbys, who admitted three sex acts in front of young girls, was g i v e n a t h r e e -y e a r community order and must do a sex offender course.
Quarter-final winners: Sam Oliver (Skelton), men's two-bowl singles, 21-15 v Trevor Bannister (Lincs); Jackie Carson (Elm Tree), women's four-bowl singles, 21-18 v Ann Lennie (Northumberland); Inga Gillespie (Elm Tree), women's senior singles, 21-14 v Hazel Rix (Norfolk); Teresa Parnell (Stockton), women's two-bowl singles, 21-20 v Jennifer Hudson (Norfolk) after being 18-20 down from being 15-10 ahead; Rob Carson & Tony Bowe (Elm Tree), men's pairs, 21-8 v Norfolk; Inga Gillespie, Vi Mitcheson, Beryl Horsfield (Smiths Dock), women's three-bowl rinks, 31-14 v Derbys.

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